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Chemistry LibreTexts

6: Experiment 6 - Atomic Structure

  • Page ID
    214683
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    Learning Objectives

    Content:

    • Understand how well different models of the atom agree with observations
    • Explain spectral lines for hydrogen gas in terms of the wavelength emitted
    • Calculate the relationship between wavelength and energy of a photon

    Process:

    • Work in groups to complete the worksheet
    • Use PHET simulation to complete this lab assignment

    Prior knowledge:

     

    The smallest piece of an element that maintains the identity of that element is called an atom. Individual atoms are extremely small. It would take about fifty million atoms in a row to make a line that is 1 cm long. The period at the end of a printed sentence has several million atoms in it. Atoms are so small that it is difficult to believe that all matter is made from atoms-but it is.

    Procedure

    June 12, 2020

    Work with your group in Zoom Breakout Rooms to solve the problems in the Worksheet. Don't forget to show your calculations for partial credit.

    Interactive Element

     

    June 16, 2020

    Use the PhET simulation below to answer the questions in your Lab Report.

    Part I: White light

    1. Turn on the gun.
    2. Make sure you selected "White".
    3. Select "Show spectrometer"
    4. Answer the questions in Part I of the Lab Report.

    Part II: Prediction

    1. Switch from Experiment to Prediction in the upper left hand corner of the simulation. 
    2. Switch to the Bohr model and turn on the Show electron energy level diagram in the upper right hand corner. Watch to see what happens in the simulation, the electron energy level diagram and the spectrometer. Answer the questions in your report regarding this model.
    3. Turn on the Schrodinger model of the atom. Answer the question in your report regarding this model.

    Interactive Element

     

     

    Contributors and Attributions

    Robert E. Belford (University of Arkansas Little Rock; Department of Chemistry). The breadth, depth and veracity of this work is the responsibility of Robert E. Belford, rebelford@ualr.edu. You should contact him if you have any concerns. This material has both original contributions, and content built upon prior contributions of the LibreTexts Community and other resources, including but not limited to:

     

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