Skip to main content
Chemistry LibreTexts

Solution Basics

  • Page ID
    1618
  • Solutions are homogeneous mixtures containing one or more solutes in a solvent. The solvent that makes up most of the solution, whereas a solute is the substance that is dissolved inside the solvent.

    • Electrolyte Solutions
      An electrolyte solution is a solution that contains ions, atoms or molecules that have lost or gained electrons, and is electrically conductive. For this reason they are often called ionic solutions, however there are some cases where the electrolytes are not ions. For this discussion we will only consider solutions of ions. A basic principle of electrostatics is that opposite charges attract and like charges repel. It also takes a great deal of force to overcome this electrostatic attraction.
    • Enthalpy of Solution
      A solution is a homogeneous mixture of two or more substances and can either be in the gas phase, the liquid phase, the solid phase. The enthalpy change of solution refers to the amount of heat that is released or absorbed during the dissolving process (at constant pressure). This enthalpy of solution can either be positive (endothermic) or negative (exothermic). When understanding the enthalpy of solution, it is easiest to think of a hypothetical three-step process.
    • Formation of Ionic Solutions
    • Interionic Attractions
    • Intermolecular Forces in Mixtures And Solutions
      Some forces that interact within pure liquids are also present during mixtures and solutions. Forces such as Cohesive as well as Adhesive forces still apply to mixtures; however, more importantly we focus on the interaction between different molecules. Why is oil only soluble in benzene and not water? Why do only "like" molecules dissolve in "like" molecules?
    • Units of Concentration
      Solutions are homogeneous mixtures containing one or more solutes in a solvent. The solvent that makes up most of the solution, whereas a solute is the substance that is dissolved inside the solvent.

    Thumbnail: https://pixabay.com/photos/chemistry...emist-3533039/