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Quantum Chemistry with Applications in Spectroscopy (Fleming)

  • Page ID
    419482
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    This text maintains a connection to measurable phenomena when discussing the otherwise abstract quantum mechanical models. In particular, efforts were directed to follow the development of each model with specific spectroscopic examples which utilize the basic models as foundations to understand the behavior of real chemical systems. The author's experience is that the methodology works better than simply talking about quantum mechanics first, and then following with a discussion of spectroscopy, as though the two topics are not related.


    This page titled Quantum Chemistry with Applications in Spectroscopy (Fleming) is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Patrick Fleming.