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10.7B: Metallic Hydrides

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    34067
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    Metallic hydrides (also known as interstitial hydrides) involve hydrogen bonds with transition metals. One interesting and unique characteristic of these hydrides are that they can be nonstoichiometric, meaning basically that the fraction of H atoms to the metals are not fixed. Nonstoichiometric compounds have a variable composition. The idea and basis for this is that with metal and hydrogen bonding there is a crystal lattice that H atoms can and may fill in between the lattice while some might, and is not a definite ordered filling. Thus it is not a fixed ratio of H atoms to the metals. Even so, metallic hydrides consist of more basic stoichiometric compounds as well.


    10.7B: Metallic Hydrides is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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