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Chemistry LibreTexts

2: Alkanes

  • Page ID
    204748
    • 2.1: Chemical Properties of Alkanes
      Alkanes are not very reactive when compared with other chemical species. This is because the backbone carbon atoms in alkanes have attained their octet of electrons through forming four covalent bonds (the maximum allowed number of bonds under the octet rule; which is why carbon's valence number is 4). These four bonds formed by carbon in alkanes are sigma bonds.
    • 2.2: Physical Properties of Alkanes
      Alkanes are not very reactive and have little biological activity; all alkanes are colorless and odorless.
    • 2.3: Nomenclature of Alkanes
      The names of all alkanes end with -ane. Whether or not the carbons are linked together end-to-end in a ring (called cyclic alkanes or cycloalkanes) or whether they contain side chains and branches, the name of every carbon-hydrogen chain that lacks any double bonds or functional groups will end with the suffix -ane.
    • 2.4: Nomenclature of Cycloalkanes
      Although polycyclic compounds are important, they are highly complex and typically have common names accepted by IUPAC. However, the common names do not generally follow the basic IUPAC nomenclature rules. The general formula of the cycloalkanes is \(C_nH_{2n}\) where n is the number of carbons. The naming of cycloalkanes follows a simple set of rules that are built upon the same basic steps in naming alkanes. Cyclic hydrocarbons have the prefix "cyclo-".
    • 2.5: Practice - Alkane Nomenclature
    • 2.6: Ethane Conformers
      The simple alkane ethane provides a good introduction to conformational analysis.
    • 2.7: Gibbs Free Energy (review)
      We can predict whether a reaction will occur spontaneously by combining the entropy, enthalpy, and temperature of a system in a new state function called Gibbs free energy (G). The change in free energy (ΔG) is the difference between the heat released during a process and the heat released for the same process occurring in a reversible manner. If a system is at equilibrium, ΔG = 0. If the process is spontaneous, ΔG < 0. If the process is not spontaneous as written.
    • 2.8: Enthalpy Changes in Reactions
      Thermodynamics is the study of the relationship between heat (or energy) and work. Enthalpy is a central factor in thermodynamics. It is the heat content of a system. The heat that passes into or out of the system during a reaction is the enthalpy change. Whether the enthalpy of the system increases (i.e. when energy is added) or decreases (because energy is given off) is a crucial factor that determines whether a reaction can happen.
    • 2.9: Entropy Changes in Chemical Reactions
      Changes in internal energy, that are not accompanied by a temperature change, might reflect changes in the entropy of the system.
    • 2.10: Activation Energy and Rate
      A minimum energy (activation energy,Ea) is required for a collision between molecules to result in a chemical reaction. Plots of potential energy for a system versus the reaction coordinate show an energy barrier that must be overcome for the reaction to occur. The arrangement of atoms at the highest point of this barrier is the activated complex, or transition state, of the reaction. At a given temperature, the higher the Ea, the slower the reaction.