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7: Acid-base Reactions

  • Page ID
    106335
    • 7.1: Prelude to Acid-base Reactions
      The glass flask sitting on a bench in Dr. Barry Marshall's lab in Perth, Western Australia, contained about thirty milliliters of a distinctly unappetizing murky, stinking yellowish liquid. A few days earlier he had poured a nutrient broth into the flask, then dropped in a small piece of tissue sample taken from the stomach of a patient suffering from chronic gastritis.
    • 7.2: Overview of Acid-Base Reactions
      We’ll begin our discussion of acid-base chemistry with a couple of essential definitions. The first of these was proposed in 1923 by the Danish chemist Johannes Brønsted and the English chemist Thomas Lowry, and has come to be known as the Brønsted-Lowry definition of acidity and basicity.
    • 7.3: The Acidity Constant
      You are no doubt aware that some acids are stronger than others. The relative acidity of different compounds or functional groups – in other words, their relative capacity to donate a proton to a common base under identical conditions – is quantified by a number called the acidity constant, abbreviated K
    • 7.4: Structural Effects on Acidity and Basicity
      Now that we know how to quantify the strength of an acid or base, our next job is to gain an understanding of the fundamental reasons behind why one compound is more acidic or more basic than another. This is a big step: we are, for the first time, taking our knowledge of organic structure and applying it to a question of organic reactivity.
    • 7.5: Acid-base Properties of Phenols
      Resonance effects involving aromatic structures can have a dramatic influence on acidity and basicity. Notice, for example, the difference in acidity between phenol and cyclohexanol.
    • 7.6: Acid-base properties of nitrogen-containing functional groups
      Many of the acid-base reactions we will see throughout our study of biological organic chemistry involve functional groups which contain nitrogen. In general, a nitrogen atom with three bonds and a lone pair of electrons can potentially act as a proton-acceptor (a base) - but basicity is reduced if the lone pair electrons are stabilized somehow.
    • 7.7: Carbon Acids
      So far, we have limited our discussion of acidity and basicity to heteroatom acids, where the acidic proton is bound to an oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, or halogen. However, carbon acids - in which the proton to be donated is bonded to a carbon atom - play an integral role in biochemistry.
    • 7.8: Polyprotic Acids
      Polyprotic acids are capable of donating more than one proton. The most important polyprotic acid group from a biological standpoint is triprotic phosphoric acid. Because phosphoric acid has three acidic protons, it also has three pKa values.
    • 7.9: Effects of enzyme microenvironment on acidity and basicity
      Virtually all biochemical reactions take place inside the active site pocket of an enzyme, rather than free in aqueous solution. The microenvironment inside an enzyme's active site can often be very different from the environment outside in the aqueous solvent. Consider, for example, the side chain carboxylate on an aspartate residue in an enzyme.
    • 7.E: Acid-base Reactions (Exercises)
    • 7.S: Acid-base Reactions (Summary)