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Introduction to Solid State Chemistry

  • Page ID
    408239
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    Introduction to Solid State Chemistry is a one-semester college course on the principles of chemistry. You’ll begin with an exploration of the fundamental relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order, then proceed to the chemical properties of “aggregates of molecules,” including crystals, metals, glasses, semiconductors, solutions and acid-base equilibria, polymers, and biomaterials. Real-world examples are drawn from industrial practice (e.g. semiconductor manufacturing), energy generation and storage (e.g. automobile engines, lithium batteries), emerging technologies (e.g. photonic and biomedical devices), and the environmental impact of chemical processing (e.g. recycling glass, metal, and plastic).

    Thumbnail: Model of intercalation of potassium into graphite. (Public Domain; Ben Mills via Wikipedia)


    This page titled Introduction to Solid State Chemistry is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Donald Sadoway (MIT OpenCourseWare) via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.