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13.5: Bonding between Metal Atoms and Organic Pi Systems

  • Page ID
    385585
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    With this section, we finally reach our first class of dative actor ligands, π systems. In contrast to the spectator L-type ligands we’ve seen so far, π systems most often play an important role in the reactivity of the OM complexes of which they are a part (since they act in reactions, they’re called “actors”). π Systems do useful chemistry, not just with the metal center, but also with other ligands and external reagents. Thus, in addition to thinking about how π systems affect the steric and electronic properties of the metal center, we need to start considering the metal’s effect on the ligand and how we might expect the ligand to behave as an active participant in reactions. To the extent that structure determines reactivity—a commonly repeated, and extremely powerful maxim in organic chemistry—we can think about possibilities for chemical change without knowing the elementary steps of organometallic chemistry in detail yet.

    Epic Ligand Survey: Pi Systems


    This page titled 13.5: Bonding between Metal Atoms and Organic Pi Systems is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Kathryn Haas.

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