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Chemistry LibreTexts

5: Gases and the Kinetic-Molecular Theory

  • Page ID
    83774
    • 5.1: An Overview of the Physical States of Matter
      Bulk matter can exist in three states: gas, liquid, and solid. Gases have the lowest density of the three, are highly compressible, and fill their containers completely. Elements that exist as gases at room temperature and pressure are clustered on the right side of the periodic table; they occur as either monatomic gases (the noble gases) or diatomic molecules (some halogens, N2, O2).
    • 5.2: Gas Pressure and Its Measurement
      Pressure is defined as the force exerted per unit area; it can be measured using a barometer or manometer. Four quantities must be known for a complete physical description of a sample of a gas: temperature, volume, amount, and pressure. Pressure is force per unit area of surface; the SI unit for pressure is the pascal (Pa), defined as 1 newton per square meter (N/m2). The pressure exerted by an object is proportional to the force it exerts and inversely proportional to the area.
    • 5.3: The Gas Laws and Their Experimental Foundations
      The volume of a gas is inversely proportional to its pressure and directly proportional to its temperature and the amount of gas. Boyle showed that the volume of a sample of a gas is inversely proportional to pressure (Boyle’s law), Charles and Gay-Lussac demonstrated that the volume of a gas is directly proportional to its temperature at constant pressure (Charles’s law), and Avogadro showed that the volume of a gas is directly proportional to the number of moles of gas (Avogadro’s law).
    • 5.4: Rearrangements of the Ideal Gas Law
    • 5.5: The Kinetic-Molecular Theory - A Model for Gas Behavior
      The behavior of ideal gases is explained by the kinetic molecular theory of gases. Molecular motion, which leads to collisions between molecules and the container walls, explains pressure, and the large intermolecular distances in gases explain their high compressibility. Although all gases have the same average kinetic energy at a given temperature, they do not all possess the same root mean square speed. The actual values of speed and kinetic energy are not the same for all gas particles.
    • 5.6: Real Gases - Deviations from Ideal Behavior
      No real gas exhibits ideal gas behavior, although many real gases approximate it over a range of conditions. Gases most closely approximate ideal gas behavior at high temperatures and low pressures. Deviations from ideal gas law behavior can be described by the van der Waals equation, which includes empirical constants to correct for the actual volume of the gaseous molecules and quantify the reduction in pressure due to intermolecular attractive forces.
    • 5.E: Gases and the Kinetic-Molecular Theory (Exercises)

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