Skip to main content
Chemistry LibreTexts

Protein Structure

  • Page ID
    495
  • Secondary structure refers to the shape of a folding protein due exclusively to hydrogen bonding between its backbone amide and carbonyl groups. Secondary structure does not include bonding between the R-groups of amino acids, hydrophobic interactions, or other interactions associated with tertiary structure. The two most commonly encountered secondary structures of a polypeptide chain are α-helices and beta-pleated sheets. These structures are the first major steps in the folding of a polypeptide chain, and they establish important topological motifs that dictate subsequent tertiary structure and the ultimate function of the protein.

    • Protein Folding
    • Secondary Structure: α-Helices
      An α-helix is a right-handed coil of amino-acid residues on a polypeptide chain, typically ranging between 4 and 40 residues. This coil is held together by hydrogen bonds between the oxygen of C=O on top coil and the hydrogen of N-H on the bottom coil.
    • Secondary Structure: β-Pleated Sheet
      This structure occurs when two (or more, e.g. ψ-loop) segments of a polypeptide chain overlap one another and form a row of hydrogen bonds with each other. This can happen in a parallel arrangement or in anti-parallel arrangement. Parallel and anti-parallel arrangement is the direct consequence of the directionality of the polypeptide chain.
    • Secondary Structure: α-Pleated Sheet
      A similar structure to the beta-pleated sheet is the α-pleated sheet. This structure is energetically less favorable than the beta-pleated sheet, and is fairly uncommon in proteins. An α-pleated sheet is characterized by the alignment of its carbonyl and amino groups; the carbonyl groups are all aligned in one direction, while all the N-H groups are aligned in the opposite direction.
    • The Structure of Proteins
      This page explains how amino acids combine to make proteins and what is meant by the primary, secondary and tertiary structures of proteins. Quaternary structure isn't covered. It only applies to proteins consisting of more than one polypeptide chain.

    Thumbnail: Structure of human hemoglobin. The proteins α and β subunits are in red and blue, and the iron-containing heme groups in green. (CC BY-SA 3.0; Zephyris).

    • Was this article helpful?