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Homework 14

  • Page ID
    28871
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    Q 3.59

    Question: When each value of n is given, what are the possible values for l?

    1. 2
    2. 4
    3. 6
    4. 8

    Strategy:

    • The relationship between the quantum number (n) and the angular momentum quantum number (l).
      • The principle quantum number is an integer that determines the overall size and energy of an orbital. The possible values for n are 1, 2, 3, … and so on.
      • The angular momentum quantum number is an integer that determines the shape of the orbital. Every value of n has a certain l value. In other words, for a given value of n, l can be any integer up to n-1.

    Example:

    If n=3, what are the possible values of l?

    Since l = n-1, and n=3. Substitute 3 with n (l=3-1), which l equals to 2 maximum values or 0, 1, 2.

    Solution:

    1. n= 2

    l= n-1

    l= 0, 1

    1. n= 4

    l= n-1

    l= 0, 1, 2, 3

    1. n= 6

    l= n-1

    l= 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

    1. n= 8

    l= n-1

    l= 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

    Q 6.53

    Question: The formula CH4 is a tetrahedral geometry. How many electron groups are on the central atom?

    Strategy:

    • Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) theory is based on the idea that electrons groups--- defined as lone pairs, single bonds, multiple bond, and single bonds--- repel one another.
    • The repulsion between the electron groups determines the geometry of the molecule.
    • The molecules that have one central atom molecular geometry depend on:
      • The number of electron groups around the central atom.
      • However many of those electron groups are bonding groups and how many are lone pairs.

    Solution:

    The formula CH4 is a tetrahedral geometry with four bonded pairs with no lone pairs, so there are four electron groups.


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