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Chemistry LibreTexts

13: Solids and Modern Materials

  • Page ID
    219227
    • 13.1: Discovery of Graphene
    • 13.2: X-Ray Crystallography
      X-ray Crystallography is a scientific method used to determine the arrangement of atoms of a crystalline solid in three dimensional space. This technique takes advantage of the interatomic spacing of most crystalline solids by employing them as a diffraction gradient for x-ray light, which has wavelengths on the order of 1 angstrom (10-8 cm).
    • 13.3: Unit Cells and Basic Structures
      When substances form solids, they tend to pack together to form ordered arrays of atoms, ions, or molecules that we call crystals. Why does this order arise, and what kinds of arrangements are possible? We will limit our discussion to cubic crystals, which form the simplest and most symmetric of all the lattice types. Cubic lattices are also very common — they are formed by many metallic crystals, and also by most of the alkali halides, several of which we will study as examples.
    • 13.4: The Fundamental Types of Crystalline Solids
      Some substances form crystalline solids consisting of particles in a very organized structure; others form amorphous (noncrystalline) solids with an internal structure that is not ordered. The main types of crystalline solids are ionic solids, metallic solids, covalent network solids, and molecular solids. The properties of the different kinds of crystalline solids are due to the types of particles of which they consist, the arrangements of the particles, and the strengths of the attractions bet
    • 13.5: The Structure of Ionic Solids
      In this section we deal mainly with a very small but imporant class of solids that are commonly regarded as composed of ions. We will see how the relative sizes of the ions determine the energetics of such compounds. And finally, we will point out that not all solids that are formally derived from ions can really be considered "ionic" at all.
    • 13.6: Network Covalent Atomic Solids- Carbon and Silicates
      Covalent solids are formed by networks or chains of atoms or molecules held together by covalent bonds. A perfect single crystal of a covalent solid is therefore a single giant molecule.
    • 13.7: Ceramics, Cement, and Glass
      Ceramics are nonmetallic, inorganic solids that are typically strong; they have high melting points but are brittle. The two major classes of modern ceramics are ceramic oxides and nonoxide ceramics, which are composed of nonmetal carbides or nitrides. The production of ceramics generally involves pressing a powder of the material into the desired shape and sintering at a temperature just below its melting point. The necessary fine powders of ceramic oxides with uniformly sized particles can be
    • 13.8: Crystalline Solids- Band Theory
      Band Theory was developed with some help from the knowledge gained during the quantum revolution in science. In 1928, Felix Bloch had the idea to take the quantum theory and apply it to solids. In 1927, Walter Heitler and Fritz London discovered bands- very closely spaced orbitals with not much difference in energy.
    • 13.9: Polymers and Plastics
      Synthetic polymers, which includes the large group known as plastics, came into prominence in the early twentieth century. Chemists' ability to engineer them to yield a desired set of properties (strength, stiffness, density, heat resistance, electrical conductivity) has greatly expanded the many roles they play in the modern industrial economy. This Module deals mostly with synthetic polymers, but will include a synopsis of some of the more important natural polymers.

    Thumbnail: Graphene is an atomic-scale honeycomb lattice made of carbon atoms. Image used with permission (CC BY-SA 3.0; AlexanderAlUS).

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