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4.E: Equilibria of Other Reaction Classes (Exercises)

  • Page ID
    210164
  • 15.1: Precipitation and Dissolution

    Q15.1.1

    Complete the changes in concentrations for each of the following reactions:

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{AgI}(s)⟶&&\ce{Ag+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{I-}(aq)\\
    & &&x &&\underline{\hspace{45px}}
    \end{alignat}\)

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{CaCO3}(s)⟶&&\ce{Ca^2+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{CO3^2-}(aq)\\
    & &&\underline{\hspace{45px}} &&x
    \end{alignat}\)

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{Mg(OH)2}(s)⟶&&\ce{Mg^2+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{2OH-}(aq)\\
    & &&x &&\underline{\hspace{45px}}
    \end{alignat}\)

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{Mg3(PO4)2}(s)⟶&&\ce{3Mg^2+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{2PO4^3-}(aq)\\
    & && &&x\underline{\hspace{45px}}
    \end{alignat}\)

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{Ca5(PO4)3OH}(s)⟶&&\ce{5Ca^2+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{3PO4^3-}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{OH-}(aq)\\
    & &&\underline{\hspace{45px}} &&\underline{\hspace{45px}} &&x
    \end{alignat}\)

    S15.1.1

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{AgI}(s)⟶&&\ce{Ag+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{I-}(aq)\\
    & &&x &&\underline{x}
    \end{alignat}\)

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{CaCO3}(s)⟶&&\ce{Ca^2+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{CO3^2-}(aq)\\
    & &&\underline{x} &&x
    \end{alignat}\)

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{Mg(OH)2}(s)⟶&&\ce{Mg^2+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{2OH-}(aq)\\
    & &&x &&\underline{2x}
    \end{alignat}\)

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{Mg3(PO4)2}(s)⟶&&\ce{3Mg^2+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{2PO4^3-}(aq)\\
    & &&\underline{3x} &&2x
    \end{alignat}\)

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{Ca5(PO4)3OH}(s)⟶&&\ce{5Ca^2+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{3PO4^3-}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{OH-}(aq)\\
    & &&\underline{5x} &&\underline{3x} &&x
    \end{alignat}\)

    Q15.1.2

    Complete the changes in concentrations for each of the following reactions:

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{BaSO4}(s)⟶&&\ce{Ba^2+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{SO4^2-}(aq)\\
    & &&x &&\underline{\hspace{45px}}
    \end{alignat}\)

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{Ag2SO4}(s)⟶&&\ce{2Ag+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{SO4^2-}(aq)\\
    & &&\underline{\hspace{45px}} &&x
    \end{alignat}\)

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{Al(OH)3}(s)⟶&&\ce{Al^3+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{3OH-}(aq)\\
    & &&x &&\underline{\hspace{45px}}
    \end{alignat}\)

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{Pb(OH)Cl}(s)⟶&&\ce{Pb^2+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{OH-}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{Cl-}(aq)\\
    & &&\underline{\hspace{45px}} &&x &&\underline{\hspace{45px}}
    \end{alignat}\)

    \(\begin{alignat}{3}
    &\ce{Ca3(AsO4)2}(s)⟶&&\ce{3Ca^2+}(aq)\,+\,&&\ce{2AsO4^3-}(aq)\\
    & &&3x &&\underline{\hspace{45px}}
    \end{alignat}\)

    Q15.1.3

    How do the concentrations of Ag+ and \(\ce{CrO4^2-}\) in a saturated solution above 1.0 g of solid Ag2CrO4 change when 100 g of solid Ag2CrO4 is added to the system? Explain.

    S15.1.3

    There is no change. A solid has an activity of 1 whether there is a little or a lot.

    Q15.1.4

    How do the concentrations of Pb2+ and S2– change when K2S is added to a saturated solution of PbS?

    Q15.1.5

    What additional information do we need to answer the following question: How is the equilibrium of solid silver bromide with a saturated solution of its ions affected when the temperature is raised?

    S15.1.5

    The solubility of silver bromide at the new temperature must be known. Normally the solubility increases and some of the solid silver bromide will dissolve.

    Q15.1.6

    Which of the following slightly soluble compounds has a solubility greater than that calculated from its solubility product because of hydrolysis of the anion present: CoSO3, CuI, PbCO3, PbCl2, Tl2S, KClO4?

    Q15.1.7

    Which of the following slightly soluble compounds has a solubility greater than that calculated from its solubility product because of hydrolysis of the anion present: AgCl, BaSO4, CaF2, Hg2I2, MnCO3, ZnS, PbS?

    S15.1.7

    CaF2, MnCO3, and ZnS

    Q15.1.8

    Write the ionic equation for dissolution and the solubility product (Ksp) expression for each of the following slightly soluble ionic compounds:

    1. PbCl2
    2. Ag2S
    3. Sr3(PO4)2
    4. SrSO4

    Q15.1.9

    Write the ionic equation for the dissolution and the Ksp expression for each of the following slightly soluble ionic compounds:

    1. LaF3
    2. CaCO3
    3. Ag2SO4
    4. Pb(OH)2

    Q15.1.10

    1. \(\ce{LaF3}(s)⇌\ce{La^3+}(aq)+\ce{3F-}(aq) \hspace{20px} K_\ce{sp}=\ce{[La^3+][F- ]^3};\)
    2. \(\ce{CaCO3}(s)⇌\ce{Ca^2+}(aq)+\ce{CO3^2-}(aq) \hspace{20px} K_\ce{sp}=\ce{[Ca^2+][CO3^2- ]};\)
    3. \(\ce{Ag2SO4}(s)⇌\ce{2Ag+}(aq)+\ce{SO4^2-}(aq) \hspace{20px} K_\ce{sp}=\ce{[Ag+]^2[SO4^2- ]};\)
    4. \(\ce{Pb(OH)2}(s)⇌\ce{Pb^2+}(aq)+\ce{2OH-}(aq) \hspace{20px} K_\ce{sp}=\ce{[Pb^2+][OH- ]^2}\)

    Q15.1.11

    The Handbook of Chemistry and Physics gives solubilities of the following compounds in grams per 100 mL of water. Because these compounds are only slightly soluble, assume that the volume does not change on dissolution and calculate the solubility product for each.

    1. BaSiF6, 0.026 g/100 mL (contains \(\ce{SiF6^2-}\) ions)
    2. Ce(IO3)4, 1.5 × 10–2 g/100 mL
    3. Gd2(SO4)3, 3.98 g/100 mL
    4. (NH4)2PtBr6, 0.59 g/100 mL (contains \(\ce{PtBr6^2-}\) ions)

    Q15.1.12

    The Handbook of Chemistry and Physics gives solubilities of the following compounds in grams per 100 mL of water. Because these compounds are only slightly soluble, assume that the volume does not change on dissolution and calculate the solubility product for each.

    1. BaSeO4, 0.0118 g/100 mL
    2. Ba(BrO3)2•H2O, 0.30 g/100 mL
    3. NH4MgAsO4•6H2O, 0.038 g/100 mL
    4. La2(MoO4)3, 0.00179 g/100 mL

    S15.1.12

    (a)1.77 × 10–7; 1.6 × 10–6; 2.2 × 10–9; 7.91 × 10–22

    Q15.1.13

    Use solubility products and predict which of the following salts is the most soluble, in terms of moles per liter, in pure water: CaF2, Hg2Cl2, PbI2, or Sn(OH)2.

    Q15.1.14

    Assuming that no equilibria other than dissolution are involved, calculate the molar solubility of each of the following from its solubility product:

    1. KHC4H4O6
    2. PbI2
    3. Ag4[Fe(CN)6], a salt containing the \(\ce{Fe(CN)4-}\) ion
    4. Hg2I2

    S15.1.15

    2 × 10–2 M; 1.3 × 10–3 M; 2.27 × 10–9 M; 2.2 × 10–10 M

    Q15.1.16

    Assuming that no equilibria other than dissolution are involved, calculate the molar solubility of each of the following from its solubility product:

    1. Ag2SO4
    2. PbBr2
    3. AgI
    4. CaC2O4•H2O

    Q15.1.X

    Assuming that no equilibria other than dissolution are involved, calculate the concentration of all solute species in each of the following solutions of salts in contact with a solution containing a common ion. Show that changes in the initial concentrations of the common ions can be neglected.

    1. AgCl(s) in 0.025 M NaCl
    2. CaF2(s) in 0.00133 M KF
    3. Ag2SO4(s) in 0.500 L of a solution containing 19.50 g of K2SO4
    4. Zn(OH)2(s) in a solution buffered at a pH of 11.45

    S15.1.X

    7.2 × 10−9 M = [Ag+], [Cl] = 0.025 M

    Check: \(\dfrac{7.2×10^{−9}\:M}{0.025\:M}×100\%=2.9×10^{−5}\%\), an insignificant change;

    2.2 × 10−5 M = [Ca2+], [F] = 0.0013 M

    Check: \(\dfrac{2.25×10^{−5}\:M}{0.00133\:M}×100\%=1.69\%\). This value is less than 5% and can be ignored.

    0.2238 M = \(\ce{[SO4^2- ]}\); [Ag+] = 2.30 × 10–9 M

    Check: \(\dfrac{1.15×10^{−9}}{0.2238}×100\%=5.14×10^{−7}\); the condition is satisfied.

    [OH] = 2.8 × 10–3 M; 5.7 × 10−12 M = [Zn2+]

    Check: \(\dfrac{5.7×10^{−12}}{2.8×10^{−3}}×100\%=2.0×10^{−7}\%\); x is less than 5% of [OH] and is, therefore, negligible.

    Q15.1.X

    Assuming that no equilibria other than dissolution are involved, calculate the concentration of all solute species in each of the following solutions of salts in contact with a solution containing a common ion. Show that changes in the initial concentrations of the common ions can be neglected.

    1. TlCl(s) in 1.250 M HCl
    2. PbI2(s) in 0.0355 M CaI2
    3. Ag2CrO4(s) in 0.225 L of a solution containing 0.856 g of K2CrO4
    4. Cd(OH)2(s) in a solution buffered at a pH of 10.995

    Assuming that no equilibria other than dissolution are involved, calculate the concentration of all solute species in each of the following solutions of salts in contact with a solution containing a common ion. Show that it is not appropriate to neglect the changes in the initial concentrations of the common ions.

    1. TlCl(s) in 0.025 M TlNO3
    2. BaF2(s) in 0.0313 M KF
    3. MgC2O4 in 2.250 L of a solution containing 8.156 g of Mg(NO3)2
    4. Ca(OH)2(s) in an unbuffered solution initially with a pH of 12.700

    S15.1.X

    • [Cl] = 7.6 × 10−3 M

    Check: \(\dfrac{7.6×10^{−3}}{0.025}×100\%=30\%\)

    This value is too large to drop x. Therefore solve by using the quadratic equation:

    • [Ti+] = 3.1 × 10–2 M
    • [Cl] = 6.1 × 10–3
    • [Ba2+] = 1.7 × 10–3 M

    Check: \(\dfrac{1.7×10^{−3}}{0.0313}×100\%=5.5\%\)

    This value is too large to drop x, and the entire equation must be solved.

    • [Ba2+] = 1.6 × 10–3 M
    • [F] = 0.0329 M;
    • Mg(NO3)2 = 0.02444 M

    \(\ce{[C2O4^2- ]}=3.5×10^{−3}\)

    Check: \(\dfrac{3.5×10^{−3}}{0.02444}×100\%=14\%\)

    This value is greater than 5%, so the quadratic equation must be used:

    • \(\ce{[C2O4^2- ]}=3.5×10^{−3}\:M\)
    • [Mg2+] = 0.0275 M
    • [OH] = 0.0501 M
    • [Ca2+] = 3.15 × 10–3

    Check: \(\dfrac{3.15×10^{−3}}{0.050}×100\%=6.28\%\)

    This value is greater than 5%, so a more exact method, such as successive approximations, must be used.

    • [Ca2+] = 2.8 × 10–3 M
    • [OH] = 0.053 × 10–2 M

    Q15.1.X

    Explain why the changes in concentrations of the common ions in Exercise can be neglected.

    Q15.1.X

    Explain why the changes in concentrations of the common ions in Exercise cannot be neglected.

    S15.1.X

    The changes in concentration are greater than 5% and thus exceed the maximum value for disregarding the change.

    Q15.1.X

    Calculate the solubility of aluminum hydroxide, Al(OH)3, in a solution buffered at pH 11.00.

    Q15.1.X

    Refer to Appendix J for solubility products for calcium salts. Determine which of the calcium salts listed is most soluble in moles per liter and which is most soluble in grams per liter.

    S15.1.X

    CaSO4∙2H2O is the most soluble Ca salt in mol/L, and it is also the most soluble Ca salt in g/L.

    Q15.1.X

    Most barium compounds are very poisonous; however, barium sulfate is often administered internally as an aid in the X-ray examination of the lower intestinal tract. This use of BaSO4 is possible because of its low solubility. Calculate the molar solubility of BaSO4 and the mass of barium present in 1.00 L of water saturated with BaSO4.

    Q15.1.X

    Public Health Service standards for drinking water set a maximum of 250 mg/L (2.60 × 10–3 M) of \(\ce{SO4^2-}\) because of its cathartic action (it is a laxative). Does natural water that is saturated with CaSO4 (“gyp” water) as a result or passing through soil containing gypsum, CaSO4•2H2O, meet these standards? What is \(\ce{SO4^2-}\) in such water?

    S15.1.X

    4.9 × 10–3 M = \(\ce{[SO4^2- ]}\) = [Ca2+]; Since this concentration is higher than 2.60 × 10–3 M, “gyp” water does not meet the standards.

    Q15.1.X

    Perform the following calculations:

    1. Calculate [Ag+] in a saturated aqueous solution of AgBr.
    2. What will [Ag+] be when enough KBr has been added to make [Br] = 0.050 M?
    3. What will [Br] be when enough AgNO3 has been added to make [Ag+] = 0.020 M?

    The solubility product of CaSO4•2H2O is 2.4 × 10–5. What mass of this salt will dissolve in 1.0 L of 0.010 M \(\ce{SO4^2-}\)?

    S15.1.X

    Mass (CaSO4•2H2O) = 0.34 g/L

    Q15.1.X

    Assuming that no equilibria other than dissolution are involved, calculate the concentrations of ions in a saturated solution of each of the following (see Table E3 for solubility products).

    1. TlCl
    2. BaF2
    3. Ag2CrO4
    4. CaC2O4•H2O
    5. the mineral anglesite, PbSO4

    Q15.1.X

    Assuming that no equilibria other than dissolution are involved, calculate the concentrations of ions in a saturated solution of each of the following (see Table E3 for solubility products).

    1. AgI
    2. Ag2SO4
    3. Mn(OH)2
    4. Sr(OH)2•8H2O
    5. the mineral brucite, Mg(OH)2

    S15.1.X

    [Ag+] = [I] = 1.2 × 10–8 M; [Ag+] = 2.86 × 10–2 M, \(\ce{[SO4^2- ]}\) = 1.43 × 10–2 M; [Mn2+] = 2.2 × 10–5 M, [OH] = 4.5 × 10–5 M; [Sr2+] = 4.3 × 10–2 M, [OH] = 8.6 × 10–2 M; [Mg2+] = 1.6 × 10–4 M, [OH] = 3.1 × 10–4 M.

    Q15.1.X

    The following concentrations are found in mixtures of ions in equilibrium with slightly soluble solids. From the concentrations given, calculate Ksp for each of the slightly soluble solids indicated:

    1. AgBr: [Ag+] = 5.7 × 10–7 M, [Br] = 5.7 × 10–7 M
    2. CaCO3: [Ca2+] = 5.3 × 10–3 M, \(\ce{[CO3^2- ]}\) = 9.0 × 10–7 M
    3. PbF2: [Pb2+] = 2.1 × 10–3 M, [F] = 4.2 × 10–3 M
    4. Ag2CrO4: [Ag+] = 5.3 × 10–5 M, 3.2 × 10–3 M
    5. InF3: [In3+] = 2.3 × 10–3 M, [F] = 7.0 × 10–3 M

    Q15.1.X

    The following concentrations are found in mixtures of ions in equilibrium with slightly soluble solids. From the concentrations given, calculate Ksp for each of the slightly soluble solids indicated:

    1. TlCl: [Tl+] = 1.21 × 10–2 M, [Cl] = 1.2 × 10–2 M
    2. Ce(IO3)4: [Ce4+] = 1.8 × 10–4 M, \(\ce{[IO3- ]}\) = 2.6 × 10–13 M
    3. Gd2(SO4)3: [Gd3+] = 0.132 M, \(\ce{[SO4^2- ]}\) = 0.198 M
    4. Ag2SO4: [Ag+] = 2.40 × 10–2 M, \(\ce{[SO4^2- ]}\) = 2.05 × 10–2 M
    5. BaSO4: [Ba2+] = 0.500 M, \(\ce{[SO4^2- ]}\) = 2.16 × 10–10 M

    S15.1.X

    2.0 × 10–4; 5.1 × 10–17; 1.35 × 10–4; 1.18 × 10–5; 1.08 × 10–10

    Q15.1.X

    Which of the following compounds precipitates from a solution that has the concentrations indicated? (See Table E3 for Ksp values.)

    1. KClO4: [K+] = 0.01 M, \(\ce{[ClO4- ]}\) = 0.01 M
    2. K2PtCl6: [K+] = 0.01 M, \(\ce{[PtCl6^2- ]}\) = 0.01 M
    3. PbI2: [Pb2+] = 0.003 M, [I] = 1.3 × 10–3 M
    4. Ag2S: [Ag+] = 1 × 10–10 M, [S2–] = 1 × 10–13 M

    Q15.1.X

    Which of the following compounds precipitates from a solution that has the concentrations indicated? (See Table E3 for Ksp values.)

    1. CaCO3: [Ca2+] = 0.003 M, \(\ce{[CO3^2- ]}\) = 0.003 M
    2. Co(OH)2: [Co2+] = 0.01 M, [OH] = 1 × 10–7 M
    3. CaHPO4: [Ca2+] = 0.01 M, \(\ce{[HPO4^2- ]}\) = 2 × 10–6 M
    4. Pb3(PO4)2: [Pb2+] = 0.01 M, \(\ce{[PO4^3- ]}\) = 1 × 10–13 M

    S15.1.X

    1. CaCO3 does precipitate.
    2. The compound does not precipitate.
    3. The compound does not precipitate.
    4. The compound precipitates.

    Q15.1.X

    Calculate the concentration of Tl+ when TlCl just begins to precipitate from a solution that is 0.0250 M in Cl.

    Q15.1.X

    Calculate the concentration of sulfate ion when BaSO4 just begins to precipitate from a solution that is 0.0758 M in Ba2+.

    S15.1.X

    1.42 × 10−9 M

    Q15.1.X

    Calculate the concentration of Sr2+ when SrF2 starts to precipitate from a solution that is 0.0025 M in F.

    Q15.1.X

    Calculate the concentration of \(\ce{PO4^3-}\) when Ag3PO4 starts to precipitate from a solution that is 0.0125 M in Ag+.

    S15.1.X

    9.2 × 10−13 M

    Q15.1.X

    Calculate the concentration of F required to begin precipitation of CaF2 in a solution that is 0.010 M in Ca2+.

    Q15.1.X

    Calculate the concentration of Ag+ required to begin precipitation of Ag2CO3 in a solution that is 2.50 × 10–6 M in \(\ce{CO3^2-}\).

    S15.1.X

    [Ag+] = 1.8 × 10–3 M

    Q15.1.X

    What [Ag+] is required to reduce \(\ce{[CO3^2- ]}\) to 8.2 × 10–4 M by precipitation of Ag2CO3?

    Q15.1.X

    What [F] is required to reduce [Ca2+] to 1.0 × 10–4 M by precipitation of CaF2?

    S15.1.X

    6.2 × 10–4

    Q15.1.X

    A volume of 0.800 L of a 2 × 10–4-M Ba(NO3)2 solution is added to 0.200 L of 5 × 10–4 M Li2SO4. Does BaSO4 precipitate? Explain your answer.

    Q15.1.X

    Perform these calculations for nickel(II) carbonate.

    1. With what volume of water must a precipitate containing NiCO3 be washed to dissolve 0.100 g of this compound? Assume that the wash water becomes saturated with NiCO3 (Ksp = 1.36 × 10–7).
    2. If the NiCO3 were a contaminant in a sample of CoCO3 (Ksp = 1.0 × 10–12), what mass of CoCO3 would have been lost? Keep in mind that both NiCO3 and CoCO3 dissolve in the same solution.

    S15.1.X

    2.28 L; 7.3 × 10–7 g

    Q15.1.X

    Iron concentrations greater than 5.4 × 10–6 M in water used for laundry purposes can cause staining. What [OH] is required to reduce [Fe2+] to this level by precipitation of Fe(OH)2?

    Q15.1.X

    A solution is 0.010 M in both Cu2+ and Cd2+. What percentage of Cd2+ remains in the solution when 99.9% of the Cu2+ has been precipitated as CuS by adding sulfide?

    S15.1.X

    100% of it is dissolved

    Q15.1.X

    A solution is 0.15 M in both Pb2+ and Ag+. If Cl is added to this solution, what is [Ag+] when PbCl2 begins to precipitate?

    Q15.1.X

    What reagent might be used to separate the ions in each of the following mixtures, which are 0.1 M with respect to each ion? In some cases it may be necessary to control the pH. (Hint: Consider the Ksp values given in Appendix J.)

    1. \(\ce{Hg2^2+}\) and Cu2+
    2. \(\ce{SO4^2-}\) and Cl
    3. Hg2+ and Co2+
    4. Zn2+ and Sr2+
    5. Ba2+ and Mg2+
    6. \(\ce{CO3^2-}\) and OH

    S15.1.X

    1. \(\ce{Hg2^2+}\) and Cu2+: Add \(\ce{SO4^2-}\).
    2. \(\ce{SO4^2-}\) and Cl: Add Ba2+.
    3. Hg2+ and Co2+: Add S2–.
    4. Zn2+ an Sr2+: Add OH until [OH] = 0.050 M.
    5. Ba2+ and Mg2+: Add \(\ce{SO4^2-}\).
    6. \(\ce{CO3^2-}\) and OH: Add Ba2+.

    Q15.1.X

    A solution contains 1.0 × 10–5 mol of KBr and 0.10 mol of KCl per liter. AgNO3 is gradually added to this solution. Which forms first, solid AgBr or solid AgCl?

    Q15.1.X

    A solution contains 1.0 × 10–2 mol of KI and 0.10 mol of KCl per liter. AgNO3 is gradually added to this solution. Which forms first, solid AgI or solid AgCl?

    S15.1.X

    AgI will precipitate first.

    Q15.1.X

    The calcium ions in human blood serum are necessary for coagulation. Potassium oxalate, K2C2O4, is used as an anticoagulant when a blood sample is drawn for laboratory tests because it removes the calcium as a precipitate of CaC2O4•H2O. It is necessary to remove all but 1.0% of the Ca2+ in serum in order to prevent coagulation. If normal blood serum with a buffered pH of 7.40 contains 9.5 mg of Ca2+ per 100 mL of serum, what mass of K2C2O4 is required to prevent the coagulation of a 10 mL blood sample that is 55% serum by volume? (All volumes are accurate to two significant figures. Note that the volume of serum in a 10-mL blood sample is 5.5 mL. Assume that the Ksp value for CaC2O4 in serum is the same as in water.)

    Q15.1.X

    About 50% of urinary calculi (kidney stones) consist of calcium phosphate, Ca3(PO4)2. The normal mid range calcium content excreted in the urine is 0.10 g of Ca2+ per day. The normal mid range amount of urine passed may be taken as 1.4 L per day. What is the maximum concentration of phosphate ion that urine can contain before a calculus begins to form?

    S15.1.X

    4 × 10−9 M

    Q15.1.X

    The pH of normal urine is 6.30, and the total phosphate concentration (\(\ce{[PO4^3- ]}\) + \(\ce{[HPO4^2- ]}\) + \(\ce{[H2PO4- ]}\) + [H3PO4]) is 0.020 M. What is the minimum concentration of Ca2+ necessary to induce kidney stone formation? (See Exercise for additional information.)

    Q15.1.X

    Magnesium metal (a component of alloys used in aircraft and a reducing agent used in the production of uranium, titanium, and other active metals) is isolated from sea water by the following sequence of reactions:

    \(\ce{Mg^2+}(aq)+\ce{Ca(OH)2}(aq)⟶\ce{Mg(OH)2}(s)+\ce{Ca^2+}(aq)\)

    \(\ce{Mg(OH)2}(s)+\ce{2HCl}(aq)⟶\ce{MgCl2}(s)+\ce{2H2O}(l)\)

    \(\ce{MgCl2}(l)\xrightarrow{\ce{electrolysis}}\ce{Mg}(s)+\ce{Cl2}(g)\)

    Sea water has a density of 1.026 g/cm3 and contains 1272 parts per million of magnesium as Mg2+(aq) by mass. What mass, in kilograms, of Ca(OH)2 is required to precipitate 99.9% of the magnesium in 1.00 × 103 L of sea water?

    S15.1.X

    3.99 kg

    Q15.1.X

    Hydrogen sulfide is bubbled into a solution that is 0.10 M in both Pb2+ and Fe2+ and 0.30 M in HCl. After the solution has come to equilibrium it is saturated with H2S ([H2S] = 0.10 M). What concentrations of Pb2+ and Fe2+ remain in the solution? For a saturated solution of H2S we can use the equilibrium:

    \(\ce{H2S}(aq)+\ce{2H2O}(l)⇌\ce{2H3O+}(aq)+\ce{S^2-}(aq) \hspace{20px} K=1.0×10^{−26}\)

    (Hint: The \(\ce{[H3O+]}\) changes as metal sulfides precipitate.)

    Q15.1.X

    Perform the following calculations involving concentrations of iodate ions:

    1. The iodate ion concentration of a saturated solution of La(IO3)3 was found to be 3.1 × 10–3 mol/L. Find the Ksp.
    2. Find the concentration of iodate ions in a saturated solution of Cu(IO3)2 (Ksp = 7.4 × 10–8).

    S15.1.X

    3.1 × 10–11; [Cu2+] = 2.6 × 10–3; \(\ce{[IO3- ]}\) = 5.3 × 10–3

    Q15.1.X

    Calculate the molar solubility of AgBr in 0.035 M NaBr (Ksp = 5 × 10–13).

    Q15.1.X

    How many grams of Pb(OH)2 will dissolve in 500 mL of a 0.050-M PbCl2 solution (Ksp = 1.2 × 10–15)?

    S15.1.X

    1.8 × 10–5 g Pb(OH)2

    Q15.1.X

    Use the simulation from the earlier Link to Learning to complete the following exercise:. Using 0.01 g CaF2, give the Ksp values found in a 0.2-M solution of each of the salts. Discuss why the values change as you change soluble salts.

    Q15.1.X

    How many grams of Milk of Magnesia, Mg(OH)2 (s) (58.3 g/mol), would be soluble in 200 mL of water. Ksp = 7.1 × 10–12. Include the ionic reaction and the expression for Ksp in your answer. (Kw = 1 × 10–14 = [H3O+][OH])

    S15.1.X

    \[\ce{Mg(OH)2}(s)⇌\ce{Mg^2+}+\ce{2OH-} \]

    \[K_\ce{sp}=\ce{[Mg^2+][OH- ]^2}\]

    \[1.14 × 10−3 g Mg(OH)2\]

    Q15.1.X

    Two hypothetical salts, LM2 and LQ, have the same molar solubility in H2O. If Ksp for LM2 is 3.20 × 10–5, what is the Ksp value for LQ?

    Q15.1.X

    Which of the following carbonates will form first? Which of the following will form last? Explain.

    1. \(\ce{MgCO3} \hspace{20px} K_\ce{sp}=3.5×10^{−8}\)
    2. \(\ce{CaCO3} \hspace{20px} K_\ce{sp}=4.2×10^{−7}\)
    3. \(\ce{SrCO3} \hspace{20px} K_\ce{sp}=3.9×10^{−9}\)
    4. \(\ce{BaCO3} \hspace{20px} K_\ce{sp}=4.4×10^{−5}\)
    5. \(\ce{MnCO3} \hspace{20px} K_\ce{sp}=5.1×10^{−9}\)

    S15.1.X

    SrCO3 will form first, since it has the smallest Ksp value it is the least soluble. BaCO3 will be the last to precipitate, it has the largest Ksp value.

    Q15.1.X

    How many grams of Zn(CN)2(s) (117.44 g/mol) would be soluble in 100 mL of H2O? Include the balanced reaction and the expression for Ksp in your answer. The Ksp value for Zn(CN)2(s) is 3.0 × 10–16.

    15.2: Lewis Acids and Bases

    Q15.2.X

    Under what circumstances, if any, does a sample of solid AgCl completely dissolve in pure water?

    S15.2.X

    when the amount of solid is so small that a saturated solution is not produced

    Q15.2.X

    Explain why the addition of NH3 or HNO3 to a saturated solution of Ag2CO3 in contact with solid Ag2CO3 increases the solubility of the solid.

    Q15.2.X

    Calculate the cadmium ion concentration, [Cd2+], in a solution prepared by mixing 0.100 L of 0.0100 M Cd(NO3)2 with 1.150 L of 0.100 NH3(aq).

    S15.2.X

    2.35 × 10–4 M

    Q15.2.X

    Explain why addition of NH3 or HNO3 to a saturated solution of Cu(OH)2 in contact with solid Cu(OH)2 increases the solubility of the solid.

    S15.2.X

    Sometimes equilibria for complex ions are described in terms of dissociation constants, Kd. For the complex ion \(\ce{AlF6^3-}\) the dissociation reaction is:

    \[\ce{AlF6^3- ⇌ Al^3+ + 6F-}\) and \(K_\ce{d}=\ce{\dfrac{[Al^3+][F- ]^6}{[AlF6^3- ]}}=2×10^{−24}\]

    Q15.2.X

    Calculate the value of the formation constant, Kf, for \(\ce{AlF6^3-}\).

    S15.2.X

    5 × 1023

    Q15.2.X

    Using the value of the formation constant for the complex ion \(\ce{Co(NH3)6^2+}\), calculate the dissociation constant.

    Q15.2.X

    Using the dissociation constant, Kd = 7.8 × 10–18, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of Cd2+ and CN in a 0.250-M solution of \(\ce{Cd(CN)4^2-}\).

    S15.2.X

    This table has two main columns and three rows. The first row for the first column does not have a heading and then has the following in the first column: Initial concentration ( M ) and Equilibrium ( M ). The second column has the header, “[ C d ( C N ) subscript 4 to the second power superscript negative sign ] [ C N superscript negative sign ] [ C d to the second power superscript positive sign ].” Under the second column is a subgroup of two rows and three columns. The first column contains the following: 0.250 and 0.250 minus x. The second column contains the following: 0 and 4 x. The third column contains the following: 0 and x.

    [Cd2+] = 9.5 × 10–5 M; [CN] = 3.8 × 10–4 M

    Q15.2.X

    Using the dissociation constant, Kd = 3.4 × 10–15, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of Zn2+ and OH in a 0.0465-M solution of \(\ce{Zn(OH)4^2-}\).

    Q15.2.X

    Using the dissociation constant, Kd = 2.2 × 10–34, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of Co3+ and NH3 in a 0.500-M solution of \(\ce{Co(NH3)6^3+}\).

    S15.2.X

    [Co3+] = 3.0 × 10–6 M; [NH3] = 1.8 × 10–5 M

    Q15.2.X

    Using the dissociation constant, Kd = 1 × 10–44, calculate the equilibrium concentrations of Fe3+ and CN in a 0.333 M solution of \(\ce{Fe(CN)6^3-}\).

    Q15.2.X

    Calculate the mass of potassium cyanide ion that must be added to 100 mL of solution to dissolve 2.0 × 10–2 mol of silver cyanide, AgCN.

    S15.2.X

    1.3 g

    Q15.2.X

    Calculate the minimum concentration of ammonia needed in 1.0 L of solution to dissolve 3.0 × 10–3 mol of silver bromide.

    Q15.2.X

    A roll of 35-mm black and white photographic film contains about 0.27 g of unexposed AgBr before developing. What mass of Na2S2O3•5H2O (sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate or hypo) in 1.0 L of developer is required to dissolve the AgBr as \(\ce{Ag(S2O3)2^3-}\) (Kf = 4.7 × 1013)?

    S15.2.X

    0.80 g

    Q15.2.X

    We have seen an introductory definition of an acid: An acid is a compound that reacts with water and increases the amount of hydronium ion present. In the chapter on acids and bases, we saw two more definitions of acids: a compound that donates a proton (a hydrogen ion, H+) to another compound is called a Brønsted-Lowry acid, and a Lewis acid is any species that can accept a pair of electrons. Explain why the introductory definition is a macroscopic definition, while the Brønsted-Lowry definition and the Lewis definition are microscopic definitions.

    Q15.2.X

    Write the Lewis structures of the reactants and product of each of the following equations, and identify the Lewis acid and the Lewis base in each:

    1. \(\ce{CO2 + OH- ⟶ HCO3-}\)
    2. \(\ce{B(OH)3 + OH- ⟶ B(OH)4-}\)
    3. \(\ce{I- + I2 ⟶ I3-}\)
    4. \(\ce{AlCl3 + Cl- ⟶ AlCl4-}\) (use Al-Cl single bonds)
    5. \(\ce{O^2- + SO3 ⟶ SO4^2-}\)

    S15.2.X

    (a)

    This figure shows a chemical reaction modeled with structural formulas. On the left side is a structure with a central C atom. O atoms, each with two unshared electron pairs, are double bonded to the left and right sides of the C atom. Following a plus sign is another structure in brackets which has an O atom with three unshared electron dot pairs single bonded to an H atom on the right. Outside the brackets is superscript negative sign. Following a right pointing arrow is a structure in brackets that has a central C atom to which 3 O atoms are bonded. Above and slightly to the right, one of the O atoms is connected with a double bond. This O atom has two unshared electron pairs. The second O atom is single bonded below and slightly to the right. This O atom has three unshared electron pairs. The third O atom is bonded to the left of the C atom. This O atom has two unshared electron pairs and an H atom single bonded to its left. Outside the brackets to the right is a superscript negative symbol. ;

    (b)

    This figure shows a chemical reaction modeled with structural formulas. On the left side is a structure that has a central B atom to which 3 O atoms are bonded. The O atoms above and below slightly right of the B atom each have an H atom single bonded to the right. The third O atom is single bonded to the left side of the B atom. This O atom has an H atom single bonded to its left side. All O atoms in this structure have two unshared electron pairs. Following a plus sign is another structure which has an O atom single bonded to an H atom on its right. The O atom has three unshared electron pairs. The structure appears in brackets with a superscript negative sign. Following a right pointing arrow is a structure in brackets has a central B atom to which 4 O atoms are bonded. The O atoms above, below, and right of the B atom each hav an H atom single bonded to the right. The third O atom is single bonded to the left side of the B atom. This O atom has an H atom single bonded to its left side. All O atoms in this structure have two unshared electron pairs. Outside the brackets to the right is a superscript negative symbol. ;

    (c)

    This figure illustrates a chemical reaction using structural formulas. On the left, two I atoms, each with 3 unshared electron pairs, are joined with a single bond. Following a plus sign is another structure which has an I atom with four pairs of electron dots and a superscript negative sign. Following a right pointing arrow is a structure in brackets that has three I atoms connected in a line with single bonds. The two end I atoms have three unshared electron dot pairs and the I atom at the center has two unshared electron pairs. Outside the brackets is a superscript negative sign. ;

    (d)

    This figure illustrates a chemical reaction using structural formulas. On the left, an A l atom is positioned at the center of a structure and three Cl atoms are single bonded above, leftt, and below. Each C l atom has three pairs of electron dots. Following a plus sign is another structure which has an F atom is surrounded by four electron dot pairs and a superscript negative symbol. Following a right pointing arrow is a structure in brackets that has a central A l atom to which 4 C l atoms are connected with single bonds above, below, to the left, and to the right. Each C l atom in this structure has three pairs of electron dots. Outside the brackets is a superscript negative symbol. ;

    (e)

    This figure illustrates a chemical reaction using structural formulas. On the left is a structure which has an S atom at the center. O atoms are single bonded above and below. These O atoms have three electron dot pairs each. To the right of the S atom is a double bonded O atom which has two pairs of electron dots. Following a plus sign is an O atom which is surrounded by four electron dot pairs and has a superscript 2 negative. Following a right pointing arrow is a structure in brackets that has a central S atom to which 4 O atoms are connected with single bonds above, below, to the left, and to the right. Each of the O atoms has three pairs of electron dots. Outside the brackets is a superscript 2 negative.

    Q15.2.X

    Write the Lewis structures of the reactants and product of each of the following equations, and identify the Lewis acid and the Lewis base in each:

    1. \(\ce{CS2 + SH- ⟶ HCS3-}\)
    2. \(\ce{BF3 + F- ⟶ BF4-}\)
    3. \(\ce{I- + SnI2 ⟶ SnI3-}\)
    4. \(\ce{Al(OH)3 + OH- ⟶ Al(OH)4-}\)
    5. \(\ce{F- + SO3 ⟶ SFO3-}\)

    Q15.2.X

    Using Lewis structures, write balanced equations for the following reactions:

    1. \(\ce{HCl}(g)+\ce{PH3}(g)⟶\)
    2. \(\ce{H3O+ + CH3- ⟶}\)
    3. \(\ce{CaO + SO3 ⟶}\)
    4. \(\ce{NH4+ + C2H5O- ⟶}\)

    S15.2.X

    (a)

    This figure represents a chemical reaction in two rows. The top row shows the reaction using chemical formulas. The second row uses structural formulas to represent the reaction. The first row contains the equation H C l ( g ) plus P H subscript 3 ( g ) right pointing arrow left bracket P H subscript 4 right bracket superscript plus plus left bracket C l with 4 pairs of electron dots right bracket superscript negative sign. The second row begins on the left with H left bracket C l with four unshared electron pairs right bracket plus a structure in brackets with a central P atom with H atoms single bonded at the left, above, and to the right. A single unshared electron pair is on the central P atom. Outside the brackets to the right is a superscript plus sign. Following a right pointing arrow is a structure in brackets with a central P atom with H atoms single bonded at the left, above, below, and to the right. Outside the brackets is a superscript plus sign. This structure is followed by a plus and a C l atom in brackets with four unshared electron pairs and a superscript negative sign. ;

    \(\ce{H3O+ + CH3- ⟶ CH4 + H2O}\)

    This figure represents a chemical reaction using structural formulas. A structure is shown in brackets on the left which is composed of a central O atom with one unshared electron pair and three single bonded H atoms to the left, right, and above the atom. Outside the brackets to the right is a superscript plus sign. Following a plus sign, is another structure in brackets composed of a central C atom with one unshared electron pair and three single bonded H atoms to the left, right, and above the atom. Outside the brackets to the right is a superscript negative sign. Following a right pointing arrow is a structure with a central C atom with H atoms single bonded above, below, left and right. Following a plus sign is a structure with a central O atom with two unshared electron pairs and two H atoms connected with single bonds. ;

    \(\ce{CaO + SO3 ⟶ CaSO4}\)

    This figure represents a chemical reaction using structural formulas. On the left, C a superscript 2 plus is just left of bracket O with four unshared electron pairs right bracket superscript 2 negative plus a structure with a central S atom to which two O atoms are single bonded at the left and right, and a single O atom is double bonded above. The two single bonded O atoms each have three unshared electron pairs and the double bonded O atom has two unshared electron pairs. Following a right pointing arrow is C a superscript 2 plus just left of a structure in brackets with a central S atom which has 4 O atoms single bonded at the left, above, below, and to the right. Each of the O atoms has three unshared electron pairs. Outside the brackets to the right is a superscript two negative. ;

    \(\ce{NH4+ + C2H5O- ⟶ C2H5OH + NH3}\)

    This figure represents a chemical reaction using structural formulas. A structure is shown in brackets on the left which is composed of a central N atom with four single bonded H atoms to the left, right, above, and below the atom. Outside the brackets to the right is a superscript plus sign. Following a plus sign, is another structure in brackets composed of a C atom with three single bonded H atoms above, below, and to the left. A second C atom is single bonded to the right. This C atom has H atoms single bonded above and below. To the right of the second C atom, an O atom is single bonded. This O atom has three unshared electron pairs. Outside the brackets to the right is a subperscript negative. Following a right pointing arrow is a structure composed of a C atom with three single bonded H atoms above, below, and to the left. A second C atom is single bonded to the right. This C atom has H atoms single bonded above and below. To the right of the second C atom, an O atom is single bonded. This O atom has two unshared electron pairs and an H atom single bonded to its right.

    Q15.2.X

    Calculate \(\ce{[HgCl4^2- ]}\) in a solution prepared by adding 0.0200 mol of NaCl to 0.250 L of a 0.100-M HgCl2 solution.

    Q15.2.X

    In a titration of cyanide ion, 28.72 mL of 0.0100 M AgNO3 is added before precipitation begins. [The reaction of Ag+ with CN goes to completion, producing the \(\ce{Ag(CN)2-}\) complex.] Precipitation of solid AgCN takes place when excess Ag+ is added to the solution, above the amount needed to complete the formation of \(\ce{Ag(CN)2-}\). How many grams of NaCN were in the original sample?

    S15.2.X

    0.0281 g

    Q15.2.X

    What are the concentrations of Ag+, CN, and \(\ce{Ag(CN)2-}\) in a saturated solution of AgCN?

    Q15.2.X

    In dilute aqueous solution HF acts as a weak acid. However, pure liquid HF (boiling point = 19.5 °C) is a strong acid. In liquid HF, HNO3 acts like a base and accepts protons. The acidity of liquid HF can be increased by adding one of several inorganic fluorides that are Lewis acids and accept F ion (for example, BF3 or SbF5). Write balanced chemical equations for the reaction of pure HNO3 with pure HF and of pure HF with BF3.

    S15.2.X

    \(\ce{HNO3}(l)+\ce{HF}(l)⟶\ce{H2NO3+}+\ce{F-}\); \(\ce{HF}(l)+\ce{BF3}(g)⟶\ce{H+}+\ce{BF4}\)

    Q15.2.X

    The simplest amino acid is glycine, H2NCH2CO2H. The common feature of amino acids is that they contain the functional groups: an amine group, –NH2, and a carboxylic acid group, –CO2H. An amino acid can function as either an acid or a base. For glycine, the acid strength of the carboxyl group is about the same as that of acetic acid, CH3CO2H, and the base strength of the amino group is slightly greater than that of ammonia, NH3.

    Q15.2.X

    Write the Lewis structures of the ions that form when glycine is dissolved in 1 M HCl and in 1 M KOH.

    Q15.2.X

    Write the Lewis structure of glycine when this amino acid is dissolved in water. (Hint: Consider the relative base strengths of the –NH2 and \(\ce{−CO2-}\) groups.)

    Q15.2.X

    Boric acid, H3BO3, is not a Brønsted-Lowry acid but a Lewis acid.

    1. Write an equation for its reaction with water.
    2. Predict the shape of the anion thus formed.
    3. What is the hybridization on the boron consistent with the shape you have predicted?

    S15.2.X

    \(\ce{H3BO3 + H2O ⟶ H4BO4- + H+}\); The electronic and molecular shapes are the same—both tetrahedral. The tetrahedral structure is consistent with sp3 hybridization.

    15.3: Multiple Equilibria

    Q15.3.1

    A saturated solution of a slightly soluble electrolyte in contact with some of the solid electrolyte is said to be a system in equilibrium. Explain. Why is such a system called a heterogeneous equilibrium?

    Q15.3.2

    Calculate the equilibrium concentration of Ni2+ in a 1.0-M solution [Ni(NH3)6](NO3)2.

    S15.3.2

    0.014 M

    Q15.3.3

    Calculate the equilibrium concentration of Zn2+ in a 0.30-M solution of \(\ce{Zn(CN)4^2-}\).

    Q15.3.4

    Calculate the equilibrium concentration of Cu2+ in a solution initially with 0.050 M Cu2+ and 1.00 M NH3.

    S15.3.2

    1.0 × 10–13 M

    Q15.3.5

    Calculate the equilibrium concentration of Zn2+ in a solution initially with 0.150 M Zn2+ and 2.50 M CN.

    Q15.3.6

    Calculate the Fe3+ equilibrium concentration when 0.0888 mole of K3[Fe(CN)6] is added to a solution with 0.0.00010 M CN.

    S15.3.2

    9 × 10−22 M

    Q15.3.7

    Calculate the Co2+ equilibrium concentration when 0.100 mole of [Co(NH3)6](NO3)2 is added to a solution with 0.025 M NH3. Assume the volume is 1.00 L.

    Q15.3.8

    The equilibrium constant for the reaction \(\ce{Hg^2+}(aq)+\ce{2Cl-}(aq)⇌\ce{HgCl2}(aq)\) is 1.6 × 1013. Is HgCl2 a strong electrolyte or a weak electrolyte? What are the concentrations of Hg2+ and Cl in a 0.015-M solution of HgCl2?

    S15.3.2

    6.2 × 10–6 M = [Hg2+]; 1.2 × 10–5 M = [Cl]; The substance is a weak electrolyte because very little of the initial 0.015 M HgCl2 dissolved.

    Q15.3.9

    Calculate the molar solubility of Sn(OH)2 in a buffer solution containing equal concentrations of NH3 and \(\ce{NH4+}\).

    Q15.3.X

    Calculate the molar solubility of Al(OH)3 in a buffer solution with 0.100 M NH3 and 0.400 M \(\ce{NH4+}\).

    S15.3.2

    [OH] = 4.5 × 10−5; [Al3+] = 2.1 × 10–20 (molar solubility)

    Q15.3.10Edit section

    What is the molar solubility of CaF2 in a 0.100-M solution of HF? Ka for HF = 7.2 × 10–4.

    Q15.3.X

    What is the molar solubility of BaSO4 in a 0.250-M solution of NaHSO4? Ka for \(\ce{HSO4-}\) = 1.2 × 10–2.

    S15.3.2

    • \(\ce{[SO4^2- ]}=0.049\:M\)
    • [Ba2+] = 2.2 × 10–9 (molar solubility)

    Q15.3.X

    What is the molar solubility of Tl(OH)3 in a 0.10-M solution of NH3?

    Q15.3.X

    What is the molar solubility of Pb(OH)2 in a 0.138-M solution of CH3NH2?

    S15.3.2

    • [OH] = 7.6 × 10−3 M
    • [Pb2+] = 4.8 × 10–12 (molar solubility)

    Q15.3.X

    A solution of 0.075 M CoBr2 is saturated with H2S ([H2S] = 0.10 M). What is the minimum pH at which CoS begins to precipitate?

    \(\ce{CoS}(s)⇌\ce{Co^2+}(aq)+\ce{S^2-}(aq) \hspace{20px} K_\ce{sp}=4.5×10^{−27}\)

    \(\ce{H2S}(aq)+\ce{2H2O}(l)⇌\ce{2H3O+}(aq)+\ce{S^2-}(aq) \hspace{20px} K=1.0×10^{−26}\)

    A 0.125-M solution of Mn(NO3)2 is saturated with H2S ([H2S] = 0.10 M). At what pH does MnS begin to precipitate?

    \(\ce{MnS}(s)⇌\ce{Mn^2+}(aq)+\ce{S^2-}(aq) \hspace{20px} K_\ce{sp}=4.3×10^{−22}\)

    \(\ce{H2S}(aq)+\ce{2H2O}(l)⇌\ce{2H3O+}(aq)+\ce{S^2-}(aq) \hspace{20px} K=1.0×10^{−26}\)

    S15.3.2

    3.27

    Q15.3.X

    Calculate the molar solubility of BaF2 in a buffer solution containing 0.20 M HF and 0.20 M NaF.

    Q15.3.X

    Calculate the molar solubility of CdCO3 in a buffer solution containing 0.115 M Na2CO3 and 0.120 M NaHCO3

    S15.3.2

    • \(\ce{[CO3^2- ]}=0.115\:M\)
    • [Cd2+] = 3 × 10−12 M

    Q15.3.X

    To a 0.10-M solution of Pb(NO3)2 is added enough HF(g) to make [HF] = 0.10 M.

    1. Does PbF2 precipitate from this solution? Show the calculations that support your conclusion.
    2. What is the minimum pH at which PbF2 precipitates?

    Calculate the concentration of Cd2+ resulting from the dissolution of CdCO3 in a solution that is 0.010 M in H2CO3.

    S15.3.2

    1 × 10−5 M

    Q15.3.X

    Both AgCl and AgI dissolve in NH3.

    1. What mass of AgI dissolves in 1.0 L of 1.0 M NH3?
    2. What mass of AgCl dissolves in 1.0 L of 1.0 M NH3?

    Calculate the volume of 1.50 M CH3CO2H required to dissolve a precipitate composed of 350 mg each of CaCO3, SrCO3, and BaCO3.

    S15.3.2

    0.0102 L (10.2 mL)

    Q15.3.X

    Even though Ca(OH)2 is an inexpensive base, its limited solubility restricts its use. What is the pH of a saturated solution of Ca(OH)2?

    Q15.3.X

    What mass of NaCN must be added to 1 L of 0.010 M Mg(NO3)2 in order to produce the first trace of Mg(OH)2?

    S15.3.2

    5 × 10−3 g

    Q15.3.X

    Magnesium hydroxide and magnesium citrate function as mild laxatives when they reach the small intestine. Why do magnesium hydroxide and magnesium citrate, two very different substances, have the same effect in your small intestine. (Hint: The contents of the small intestine are basic.)

    Q15.3.X

    The following question is taken from a Chemistry Advanced Placement Examination and is used with the permission of the Educational Testing Service.

    Solve the following problem:

    \(\ce{MgF2}(s)⇌\ce{Mg^2+}(aq)+\ce{2F-}(aq)\)

    In a saturated solution of MgF2 at 18 °C, the concentration of Mg2+ is 1.21 × 10–3 M. The equilibrium is represented by the preceding equation.

    1. Write the expression for the solubility-product constant, Ksp, and calculate its value at 18 °C.
    2. Calculate the equilibrium concentration of Mg2+ in 1.000 L of saturated MgF2 solution at 18 °C to which 0.100 mol of solid KF has been added. The KF dissolves completely. Assume the volume change is negligible.
    3. Predict whether a precipitate of MgF2 will form when 100.0 mL of a 3.00 × 10–3-M solution of Mg(NO3)2 is mixed with 200.0 mL of a 2.00 × 10–3-M solution of NaF at 18 °C. Show the calculations to support your prediction.
    4. At 27 °C the concentration of Mg2+ in a saturated solution of MgF2 is 1.17 × 10–3 M. Is the dissolving of MgF2 in water an endothermic or an exothermic process? Give an explanation to support your conclusion.

    S15.3.2

    Ksp = [Mg2+][F]2 = (1.21 × 10–3)(2 × 1.21 × 10–3)2 = 7.09 × 10–9; 7.09 × 10–7 M

    Determine the concentration of Mg2+ and F that will be present in the final volume. Compare the value of the ion product [Mg2+][F]2 with Ksp. If this value is larger than Ksp, precipitation will occur. 0.1000 L × 3.00 × 10–3 M Mg(NO3)2 = 0.3000 L × M Mg(NO3)2 M Mg(NO3)2 = 1.00 × 10–3 M 0.2000 L × 2.00 × 10–3 M NaF = 0.3000 L × M NaF M NaF = 1.33 × 10–3 M ion product = (1.00 × 10–3)(1.33 × 10–3)2 = 1.77 × 10–9 This value is smaller than Ksp, so no precipitation will occur. MgF2 is less soluble at 27 °C than at 18 °C. Because added heat acts like an added reagent, when it appears on the product side, the Le Chatelier’s principle states that the equilibrium will shift to the reactants’ side to counter the stress. Consequently, less reagent will dissolve. This situation is found in our case. Therefore, the reaction is exothermic.

    Q15.3.X

    Which of the following compounds, when dissolved in a 0.01-M solution of HClO4, has a solubility greater than in pure water: CuCl, CaCO3, MnS, PbBr2, CaF2? Explain your answer.

    Q15.3.X

    Which of the following compounds, when dissolved in a 0.01-M solution of HClO4, has a solubility greater than in pure water: AgBr, BaF2, Ca3(PO4)3, ZnS, PbI2? Explain your answer.

    BaF2, Ca3(PO4)2, ZnS; each is a salt of a weak acid, and the \(\ce{[H3O+]}\) from perchloric acid reduces the equilibrium concentration of the anion, thereby increasing the concentration of the cations

    Q15.3.X

    What is the effect on the amount of solid Mg(OH)2 that dissolves and the concentrations of Mg2+ and OH when each of the following are added to a mixture of solid Mg(OH)2 and water at equilibrium?

    1. MgCl2
    2. KOH
    3. HClO4
    4. NaNO3
    5. Mg(OH)2

    Q15.3.X

    What is the effect on the amount of CaHPO4 that dissolves and the concentrations of Ca2+ and \(\ce{HPO4-}\) when each of the following are added to a mixture of solid CaHPO4 and water at equilibrium?

    1. CaCl2
    2. HCl
    3. KClO4
    4. NaOH
    5. CaHPO4

    S15.3.X

    Effect on amount of solid CaHPO4, [Ca2+], [OH]: increase, increase, decrease; decrease, increase, decrease; no effect, no effect, no effect; decrease, increase, decrease; increase, no effect, no effect

    Q15.3.X

    Identify all chemical species present in an aqueous solution of Ca3(PO4)2 and list these species in decreasing order of their concentrations. (Hint: Remember that the \(\ce{PO4^3-}\) ion is a weak base.)

    Q15.3.X

    A volume of 50 mL of 1.8 M NH3 is mixed with an equal volume of a solution containing 0.95 g of MgCl2. What mass of NH4Cl must be added to the resulting solution to prevent the precipitation of Mg(OH)2?

    S15.3.X

    7.1 g

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