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Unit 5: Intermolecular Forces

  • Page ID
    36154
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    The physical properties of a substance depends upon its physical state. Water vapor, liquid water and ice all have the same chemical properties, but their physical properties are considerably different. In general Covalent bonds determine: molecular shape, bond energies, chemical properties, while intermolecular forces (non-covalent bonds) influence the physical properties of liquids and solids. The kinetic molecular theory of gases gives a reasonably accurate description of the behavior of gases. A similar model can be applied to liquids, but it must take into account the nonzero volumes of particles and the presence of strong intermolecular attractive forces.

    The learning objectives of this unit are:

    Unit Topic Learning Objectives

    5

    1. Phases of Matter
    2. Intermolecular Forces
    1. Name the various types of phase changes
    2. Compare and contrast intramolecular interactions and intermolecular interactions
    3. List the different types of intermolecular forces
    4. Explain the origin and governing factors of dispersion forces

    5

    Intermolecular Forces

    1. Explain the origin of dipole-dipole forces
    2. Describe the role of intermolecular interactions on miscibility
    3. Explain the origin of hydrogen bonding

    5

    Intermolecular Forces

    1. Explain the origin of ion-dipole forces
    2. Predict which intermolecular interactions are important for a chemical species
    3. Use the intermolecular forces present in a chemical species to explain properties such as boiling / melting points, surface tension, and volatility
    4. Describe the unique properties of water and explain their dependence on intermolecular interactions

    5

    1. Super-Critical Fluids
    2. Phase diagrams
    1. Define a super-critical fluid
    2. Sketch a simple phase diagram, labeling it appropriately
    3. Interpret the effect of a temperature or pressure change on a sample using a phase diagram


    Unit 5: Intermolecular Forces is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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