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Chemistry LibreTexts

12: Stoichiometry Applications

  • Page ID
    367870
    • Anonymous
    • LibreTexts
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    As you have probably gathered by now, stoichiometry is one of the core principles of chemistry which we have revisited again and again. This is our final chapter on stoichiometry: we will both revisit some of the ideas covered previously and introduce some concepts which may not have been covered earlier in the semester.

    • 12.1: Stoichiometry Review
      We have used balanced equations to set up ratios, in terms of moles of materials, that we can use as conversion factors to answer stoichiometric questions—such as how many moles of substance A react with so many moles of reactant B. We can extend this technique even further. Recall that we can relate a molar amount to a mass amount using molar mass. We can use that relation to answer stoichiometry questions in terms of the masses of a particular substance, in addition to moles.
    • 12.2: Limiting Reactant
      In all the examples discussed thus far, the reactants were assumed to be present in stoichiometric quantities, with none of the reactants left over at the end of the reaction. Often reactants are present in mole ratios that are not the same as the ratio of the coefficients in the balanced chemical equation. As a result, one or more of them will not be used up completely, but will be left over when the reaction is completed.
    • 12.3: Theoretical Yield, and Percent Yield
      Chemists need a measurement that indicates how successful a reaction has been. This measurement is called the percent yield. The limiting reagent is that reactant that produces the least amount of product. Mass-mass calculations can determine how much product is produced and how much of the other reactants remain.
    • 12.4: Enthalpy Change is a Measure of the Heat Evolved or Absorbed
      A chemical reaction or physical change is endothermic if heat is absorbed by the system from the surroundings. In the course of an endothermic process, the system gains heat from the surroundings and so the temperature of the surroundings decreases. The quantity of heat for a process is represented by the letter q. The sign of q for an endothermic process is positive because the system is gaining heat. A chemical reaction or physical change is exothermic if heat is released by the system.
    • 12.E: Stoichiometry Applications (Exercises)
      These are exercises and select solutions to company Chapter 5 of the "Beginning Chemistry" Textmap formulated around the Ball et al. textbook.


    12: Stoichiometry Applications is shared under a mixed license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Anonymous.

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