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Chemistry LibreTexts

5: Reaction Rates

  • Page ID
    221486
    • 5.1: Concept of Reaction Rate
      The reaction rate or rate of reaction is the speed at which a chemical reaction takes place
    • 5.2: Measuring Reaction Rates- Rate Expression
      The rate of a reaction can be expressed either in terms of the decrease in the amount of a reactant or the increase in the amount of a product per unit time. Relations between different rate expressions for a given reaction are derived directly from the stoichiometric coefficients of the equation representing the reaction.
    • 5.3: Collision Theory
      Collision theory explain that, in order to react, reactant molecules must collide with the right amount energy and the right orientation
    • 5.4: Activation Energy
      The activation energy is the energy barrier that reactants must overcome to be transformed into products
    • 5.5: Potential Energy Diagrams
      A potential energy diagram shows the change in potential energy of a system as reactants are converted into products
    • 5.6: Activated Complex
      The activated complex corresponds to the transition state at the peak of the activation energy
    • 5.7: Factors Affecting Reaction Rates
      The rate of a chemical reaction is affected by several parameters. Reactions involving two phases proceed more rapidly when there is greater surface area contact. If temperature or reactant concentration is increased, the rate of a given reaction generally increases as well. A catalyst can increase the rate of a reaction by providing an alternative pathway that causes the activation energy of the reaction to decrease.
    • 5.8: Rate Laws- predicting reaction rate
      Rate laws provide a mathematical description of how changes in the amount of a substance affect the rate of a chemical reaction. Rate laws are determined experimentally and cannot be predicted by reaction stoichiometry. The order of reaction describes how much a change in the amount of each substance affects the overall rate, and the overall order of a reaction is the sum of the orders for each substance present in the reaction.

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