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More About Electronics

  • Page ID
    4197
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    Methoxybenzene or anisole has six carbons, but only four peaks in the spectrum because of symmetry. These peaks are all above 100 ppm, but some peaks are as far downfield as 160 ppm.

    anisole.gif

    NMR mo3.gif

    Figure NMR9.13C NMR spectrum of methoxybenzene (anisole).

    Source: SDBSWeb : http://riodb01.ibase.aist.go.jp/sdbs/ (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology of Japan, 15 August 2008)

    • Benzaldehyde has peaks between 130 and 140 ppm, as well as one near 190 ppm. Just as in the sp3 region of the spectrum, when a carbon is attached to an electronegative element, it moves further downfield, and since the carbonyl (or C=O) carbon in the aldehyde has two bonds to oxygen, it shows up considerably downfield. The carbonyl carbon in some ketones can show up as far as 210 ppm.

      benzaldehyde.gif

      Figure NMR10. 13C NMR spectrum of benzaldehyde.

      Source: SDBSWeb : http://riodb01.ibase.aist.go.jp/sdbs/ (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology of Japan, 15 August 2008)


    This page titled More About Electronics is shared under a CC BY-NC 3.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Chris Schaller.

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