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16.3: Physical Properties

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    22270
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    The polarity of the carbonyl group is manifest in the physical properties of carbonyl compounds. Boiling points for the lower members of a series of aldehydes and ketones are \(50\)-\(80^\text{o}\) higher than for hydrocarbons of the same molecular weight; this may be seen by comparing the data of Table 16-2 (physical properties of aldehydes and ketones) with those in Table 4-1 (physical properties of alkanes).

    Table 16-2: Physical Properties of Aldehydes and Ketones

    Roberts and Caserio Screenshot 16-2-1.png

    The water solubility of the lower-molecular-weight aldehydes and ketones is pronounced (see Table 16-2). This is to be expected for most carbonyl compounds of low molecular weight and is the consequence of hydrogen-bonding between the water and the electronegative oxygen of the carbonyl group:

    Roberts and Caserio Screenshot 16-2-2.png

    Contributors and Attributions

    John D. Robert and Marjorie C. Caserio (1977) Basic Principles of Organic Chemistry, second edition. W. A. Benjamin, Inc. , Menlo Park, CA. ISBN 0-8053-8329-8. This content is copyrighted under the following conditions, "You are granted permission for individual, educational, research and non-commercial reproduction, distribution, display and performance of this work in any format."


    This page titled 16.3: Physical Properties is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by John D. Roberts and Marjorie C. Caserio.

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