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12.9: Reactions of Coordinated Ligands

  • Page ID
    385521
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    So far, our coverage of the reactions of metal complexes has focused only on the reactions that occur at the metal center. However, there are also reactions that can occur to the ligands bound at the metal center. When a ligand binds to an electropositive metal center, bonds within the ligand can be polarized in new ways, leading to new or enhanced reactivity. Some of these reactions are covered in the chapters on organometallic chemistry, and there are many examples of how biology employs metal ions at enzyme active sites to catalyze biological transformations. This section will briefly describe some of the most common types of reactions that can be catalyzed by metal ion binding.


    This page titled 12.9: Reactions of Coordinated Ligands is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Kathryn Haas.

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