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Chemistry LibreTexts

5: Gases

  • Page ID
    37993
    • 5.1: Water from Wells: Atmospheric Pressure at Work
      t impossible to pump water from very deep in the ground with a surface pump. The key to understanding why is realizing that suction is not a force, but simply removing an opposing force to the force of air pressure which is already there.
    • 5.2: Pressure: The Result of Particle Collisions
      Gases exert pressure, which is force per unit area. The pressure of a gas may be expressed in the SI unit of pascal or kilopascal, as well as in many other units including torr, atmosphere, and bar. Atmospheric pressure is measured using a barometer; other gas pressures can be measured using one of several types of manometers.
    • 5.3: The Simple Gas Laws: Boyle’s Law, Charles’s Law and Avogadro’s Law
      The volume of a gas is inversely proportional to its pressure and directly proportional to its temperature and the amount of gas. Boyle showed that the volume of a sample of a gas is inversely proportional to pressure (Boyle’s law), Charles and Gay-Lussac demonstrated that the volume of a gas is directly proportional to its temperature at constant pressure (Charles’s law), and Avogadro showed that the volume of a gas is directly proportional to the number of moles of gas (Avogadro’s law).
    • 5.4: The Ideal Gas Law
      The empirical relationships among the volume, the temperature, the pressure, and the amount of a gas can be combined into the ideal gas law, PV = nRT. The proportionality constant, R, is called the gas constant. The ideal gas law describes the behavior of an ideal gas, a hypothetical substance whose behavior can be explained quantitatively by the ideal gas law and the kinetic molecular theory of gases. Standard temperature and pressure (STP) is 0°C and 1 atm.
    • 5.5: Applications of the Ideal Gas Law: Molar Volume, Density and Molar Mass of a Gas
      The relationship between the amounts of products and reactants in a chemical reaction can be expressed in units of moles or masses of pure substances, of volumes of solutions, or of volumes of gaseous substances. The ideal gas law can be used to calculate the volume of gaseous products or reactants as needed. In the laboratory, gases produced in a reaction are often collected by the displacement of water from filled vessels; the amount of gas can be calculated from the volume of water displaced.
    • 5.6: Mixtures of Gases and Partial Pressures
      The pressure exerted by each gas in a gas mixture is independent of the pressure exerted by all other gases present. Consequently, the total pressure exerted by a mixture of gases is the sum of the partial pressures of the components (Dalton’s law of partial pressures). The amount of gas in a mixture may be described by its partial pressure or its mole fraction. In a mixture, the partial pressure of each gas is the product of the total pressure and the mole fraction.
    • 5.7: Gases in Chemical Reactions: Stoichiometry Revisited
    • 5.8: Kinetic Molecular Theory: A Model for Gases
      The behavior of ideal gases is explained by the kinetic molecular theory of gases. Molecular motion, which leads to collisions between molecules and the container walls, explains pressure, and the large intermolecular distances in gases explain their high compressibility. Although all gases have the same average kinetic energy at a given temperature, they do not all possess the same root mean square speed. The actual values of speed and kinetic energy are not the same for all gas particles.
    • 5.9: Mean Free Path, Diffusion, and Effusion of Gases
      Diffusion is the gradual mixing of gases to form a sample of uniform composition even in the absence of mechanical agitation. In contrast, effusion is the escape of a gas from a container through a tiny opening into an evacuated space. The rate of effusion of a gas is inversely proportional to the square root of its molar mass (Graham’s law), a relationship that closely approximates the rate of diffusion. As a result, light gases tend to diffuse and effuse much more rapidly than heavier gases.
    • 5.10: Real Gases: The Effects of Size and Intermolecular Forces
      No real gas exhibits ideal gas behavior, although many real gases approximate it over a range of conditions. Gases most closely approximate ideal gas behavior at high temperatures and low pressures. Deviations from ideal gas law behavior can be described by the van der Waals equation, which includes empirical constants to correct for the actual volume of the gaseous molecules and quantify the reduction in pressure due to intermolecular attractive forces.
    • 5.E: Gases (Exercises)