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10.3.1: A Mole Map for Concentration

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    373578
    • Anonymous
    • LibreTexts

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    When we make stoichiometric calculations on solutions, we will be using molarity as the measure of concentration. Remember, the formula for molarity is:

    \[\mathrm{molarity=\dfrac{number\: of\: moles\: of\: solute}{number\: of\: liters\: of\: solution}} \label{defMolarity}\]

    You have already seen a few examples of calculations using the definition of molarity. There are numerous possible ways to use the molarity concept in a calculation. You could be using molarity as a conversion factor to find either moles of solute for liters of solution. Or you could be finding the molarity if provided the moles of solute and liters of solution. And of course, the point of a mole roadmap is to have a method for going through a series of several calculations, so you would not necessarily be given everything that is suggested in the examples above in every single problem.

    Take a moment to add something to your mole roadmap which incorporates the concept of molarity along with the concepts already listed in your mole roadmap. Please refer back to the examples in the section where molarity was first introduced as you come up with your mole roadmap. Once you have completed your mole roadmap, move on through the remainder of the subsections and see if applying your mole roadmap works for solving the problems listed there. If not, revise your mole roadmap as appropriate.


    This page titled 10.3.1: A Mole Map for Concentration is shared under a mixed license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Anonymous.

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