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5: Periodic Table

  • Page ID
    118801
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    • 5.1: Looking for Patterns: The Periodic Table
      Certain elemental properties become apparent in a survey of the periodic table as a whole. Every element can be classified as either a metal, a nonmetal, or a metalloid (or semi metal). A metal is a substance that is shiny, typically (but not always) silvery in color, and an excellent conductor of electricity and heat. Metals are also malleable (they can be beaten into thin sheets) and ductile (they can be drawn into thin wires).
    • 5.2: The Explanatory Power of the Quantum-Mechanical Model
      The chemical properties of elements is determined primarily by the number and distribution of valence electrons.


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