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13.3: Electron Counting in Organometallic Complexes

  • Page ID
    385574
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    In this section we will learn how to count valence electrons in coordination compounds. Electron counting is important because the number of electrons in a complex can be used to predict the compound's stability and reactivity. There are two different methods that are commonly used, and each is described below. Each of the two methods will lead to the same result if done correctly. Which method you prefer is “personal taste”, but each method is about equally common in the literature, so it is good to be familiar with both of them.


    This page titled 13.3: Electron Counting in Organometallic Complexes is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Kathryn Haas.

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