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Chemistry LibreTexts

7: Eggs

  • Page ID
    92927
    • 7.1: Eggs Grade
    • 7.2: Composition and Nutrition
      Worth noting is the concentration of certain food elements in different parts of the egg. Note for example that all the cholesterol is in the yolk. The yolk is relatively rich in iron and the white is high in calcium.
    • 7.3: Egg Products
      A number of egg products besides whole shell eggs are used in the baking and food service industry. By law, all egg products other than shell eggs are pasteurized to protect them against salmonella, and the low temperature at which they are kept inhibits bacterial activity, although under certain conditions they may spoil very rapidly.
    • 7.4: The Function of Eggs
      Eggs are a truly multifunctional ingredient and have many roles to play in the bakeshop. Their versatility means that product formulas may be adjusted once the properties of eggs are understood. For example, in French butter cream, egg whites may be substituted in the summer for whole eggs to give a more stable and bacteria-free product (egg white is alkaline, with pH 8.5). A yolk or two may be worked into a sweet short paste dough to improve its extensibility.
    • 7.5: Storing Eggs
      Whole eggs are the perfect medium for the development of bacteria and mould. Eggs with an undesirable odor may be high in bacteria or mould. While some of these odors disappear in baking, some will remain and give an off-taste to the product if the odor is concentrated and strong.

    Thumbnail: Chicken eggs vary in color depending on the hen. (CC BY-SA 3.0; Fir0002).

    Contributors and Attributions

    • Sorangel Rodriguez-Velazquez (American University). Chemistry of Cooking by Sorangel Rodriguez-Velazquez is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted

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