Skip to main content
Chemistry LibreTexts

Group Work 13: Hybrid Orbitals

[ "article:topic", "authorname:levingern", "showtoc:no" ]
  • Page ID
    31885
  • Name: ______________________________

    Section: _____________________________

    Student ID#:__________________________

    Work in groups on these problems. You should try to answer the questions without referring to your textbook. If you get stuck, try asking another group for help.

    In general chemistry, we introduce the concept of hybrid orbitals. This group work explores how they arise. 

    One of the hybrid orbitals is named \(sp\). Generally, assign the \(p_z\) orbital to combine with the \(s\)-orbital to create the \(sp\) hybrid orbital. What does the name suggest comprises the orbital?

     

     

     

    How can you combine wavefunctions describing the \(s\)-orbital, \(\psi_{2s}\), and the \(p\)-orbital, \(\psi_{2p}\) to create a new \(sp\) hybrid atomic orbital?

     

     

     

    How many electrons can reside in the \(s\)-orbital, \(\psi_{2s}\)? How many electrons can reside in the \(p\)-orbital, \(\psi_{2p}\)? Why?

     

     

     

    How many electrons can reside in your new hybrid atomic orbital? How many electrons do you need to be able to accomodate from the original \(s-\) and \(p\)-orbitals?

     

     

     

    How can you create hybrid orbitals to accommodate all these electrons?

     

     

     

    If \(\psi_{2s}\) and \(\psi_{2p_z}\) are actual H-atom wavefunctions, is your new hybrid atomic orbital normalized? If not, how can you normalize it?