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2.11: Introduction to Operators

  • Page ID
    431403
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    Operators are symbols in the Python language that perform operations on one or more variable (operand) to produce a result.  Common mathematical operations like + for addition are operators, but the result can depend on the type of data they operate on (1+1=2, but "1"+"1"="11", as the former are integers while the latter are string type)

    Types of Operators

    1. Arithmetic Operators
    2. Comparison Operators
    3. Assignment Operators
    4. Logical Operators
    5. Identity Opeators
    6. Membership Operators
    7. Bitwise Operators

     

    It should be noted that the result of an operator is based on the data type it operates on.  There can also be some confusion between a function and an operator, as a function can be built to do an operation.  A function has parameters and so a function call must have parenthesis (). The following code does the same thing, with the first line being the arithmetic  power operator, and the second the power function, which is a built-in function.

    x=5**3
    y=pow(5,3)
    print(x)
    print(y)
    Hello world!

     

     


    This page titled 2.11: Introduction to Operators is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Robert Belford.

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