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3.3: Predicting Charges of Ions

  • Page ID
    217255
  • Skills to Develop

    • Define ions, cations and anions
    • Predict the charge of an anion or cation based upon the location of the element in the periodic table

    Ions of Elements

     

    In ordinary chemical reactions, the nucleus of each atom remains unchanged. Electrons, however, can be added to atoms by transfer form other atoms, lost by transfer to other atoms, or shared with other atoms. The transfer and sharing of electrons among atoms govern the chemistry of the elements. During the formation of some compounds, atoms gain or lose electrons, and form electrically charged particles called ions (Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\); Video \(\PageIndex{1}\))

    Figure A shows a sodium atom, N a, which has a nucleus containing 11 protons and 12 neutrons. The atom’s surrounding electron cloud contains 11 electrons. Figure B shows a sodium ion, N a superscript plus sign. Its nucleus contains 11 protons and 12 neutrons. The ion’s electron cloud contains 10 electrons and is smaller than that of the sodium atom in figure A.

    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): (a) A sodium atom (Na) has equal numbers of protons and electrons (11) and is uncharged. (b) A sodium cation (Na+) has lost an electron, so it has one more proton (11) than electrons (10), giving it an overall positive charge, signified by a superscripted plus sign.

     

    One can use the periodic table to predict whether an atom will form an anion or a cation, and you can often predict the charge of the resulting ion. Atoms of many main-group metals lose enough electrons to leave them with the same number of electrons as an atom of the preceding noble gas. To illustrate, an atom of an alkali metal (group 1) loses one electron and forms a cation with a 1+ charge; an alkaline earth metal (group 2) loses two electrons and forms a cation with a 2+ charge, and so on. For example, a neutral calcium atom, with 20 protons and 20 electrons, readily loses two electrons. This results in a cation with 20 protons, 18 electrons, and a 2+ charge. It has the same number of electrons as atoms of the preceding noble gas, argon, and is symbolized Ca2+. The name of a metal ion is the same as the name of the metal atom from which it forms, so Ca2+ is called a calcium ion.

    When atoms of nonmetal elements form ions, they generally gain enough electrons to give them the same number of electrons as an atom of the next noble gas in the periodic table. Atoms of group 17 gain one electron and form anions with a 1− charge; atoms of group 16 gain two electrons and form ions with a 2− charge, and so on. For example, the neutral bromine atom, with 35 protons and 35 electrons, can gain one electron to provide it with 36 electrons. This results in an anion with 35 protons, 36 electrons, and a 1− charge. It has the same number of electrons as atoms of the next noble gas, krypton, and is symbolized Br. (A discussion of the theory supporting the favored status of noble gas electron numbers reflected in these predictive rules for ion formation is provided in a later chapter of this text.)

    Note the usefulness of the periodic table in predicting likely ion formation and charge (Figure \(\PageIndex{2}\)). Moving from the far left to the right on the periodic table, main-group elements tend to form cations with a charge equal to the group number. That is, group 1 elements form 1+ ions; group 2 elements form 2+ ions, and so on. Moving from the far right to the left on the periodic table, elements often form anions with a negative charge equal to the number of groups moved left from the noble gases. For example, group 17 elements (one group left of the noble gases) form 1− ions; group 16 elements (two groups left) form 2− ions, and so on. This trend can be used as a guide in many cases, but its predictive value decreases when moving toward the center of the periodic table. In fact, transition metals and some other metals often exhibit variable charges that are not predictable by their location in the table. For example, copper can form ions with a 1+ or 2+ charge, and iron can form ions with a 2+ or 3+ charge.

    Group one of the periodic table contains L i superscript plus sign in period 2, N a superscript plus sign in period 3, K superscript plus sign in period 4, R b superscript plus sign in period 5, C s superscript plus sign in period 6, and F r superscript plus sign in period 7. Group two contains B e superscript 2 plus sign in period 2, M g superscript 2 plus sign in period 3, C a superscript 2 plus sign in period 4, S r superscript 2 plus sign in period 5, B a superscript 2 plus sign in period 6, and R a superscript 2 plus sign in period 7. Group six contains C r superscript 3 plus sign and C r superscript 6 plus sign in period 4. Group seven contains M n superscript 2 plus sign in period 4. Group eight contains F e superscript 2 plus sign and F e superscript 3 plus sign in period 4. Group nine contains C o superscript 2 plus sign in period 4. Group ten contains N i superscript 2 plus sign in period 4, and P t superscript 2 plus sign in period 6. Group 11 contains C U superscript plus sign and C U superscript 2 plus sign in period 4, A g superscript plus sign in period 5, and A u superscript plus sign and A u superscript 3 plus sign in period 6. Group 12 contains Z n superscript 2 plus sign in period 4, C d superscript 2 plus sign in period 5, and H g subscript 2 superscript 2 plus sign and H g superscript 2 plus sign in period 6. Group 13 contains A l superscript 3 plus sign in period 3. Group 14 contains C superscript 4 negative sign in period 2. Group 15 contains N superscript 3 negative sign in period 2, P superscript 3 negative sign in period 3, and A s superscript 3 negative sign in period 4. Group 16 contains O superscript 2 negative sign in period 2, S superscript 2 negative sign in period 3, S e superscript 2 negative sign in period 4 and T e superscript 2 negative sign in period 5. Group 17 contains F superscript negative sign in period 2, C l superscript negative sign in period 3, B r superscript negative sign in period 4, I superscript negative sign in period 5, and A t superscript negative sign in period 6. Group 18 contains H e in period 1, N e in period 2, A r in period 3, K r in period 4, X e in period 5 and R n in period 6.

    Figure \(\PageIndex{2}\): Some elements exhibit a regular pattern of ionic charge when they form ions.

    Example \(\PageIndex{1}\): Composition of Ions

    An ion found in some compounds used as antiperspirants contains 13 protons and 10 electrons. What is its symbol?

    Solution

    Because the number of protons remains unchanged when an atom forms an ion, the atomic number of the element must be 13. Knowing this lets us use the periodic table to identify the element as Al (aluminum). The Al atom has lost three electrons and thus has three more positive charges (13) than it has electrons (10). This is the aluminum cation, Al3+.

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{1}\)

    Give the symbol and name for the ion with 34 protons and 36 electrons.

    Answer

    Se2−, the selenide ion

    Example \(\PageIndex{2}\): Formation of Ions

    Magnesium and nitrogen react to form an ionic compound. Predict which forms an anion, which forms a cation, and the charges of each ion. Write the symbol for each ion and name them.

    Solution

    Magnesium’s position in the periodic table (group 2) tells us that it is a metal. Metals form positive ions (cations). A magnesium atom must lose two electrons to have the same number electrons as an atom of the previous noble gas, neon. Thus, a magnesium atom will form a cation with two fewer electrons than protons and a charge of 2+. The symbol for the ion is Mg2+, and it is called a magnesium ion.

    Nitrogen’s position in the periodic table (group 15) reveals that it is a nonmetal. Nonmetals form negative ions (anions). A nitrogen atom must gain three electrons to have the same number of electrons as an atom of the following noble gas, neon. Thus, a nitrogen atom will form an anion with three more electrons than protons and a charge of 3−. The symbol for the ion is N3−, and it is called a nitride ion.

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{2}\)

    Aluminum and carbon react to form an ionic compound. Predict which forms an anion, which forms a cation, and the charges of each ion. Write the symbol for each ion and name them.

    Answer

    Al will form a cation with a charge of 3+: Al3+, an aluminum ion. Carbon will form an anion with a charge of 4−: C4−, a carbide ion.

     

     

    Summary

    Video \(\PageIndex{1}\): What are ions?

     

    Glossary

    anion
    negative ions that are formed when a nonmental atom gains one or more electrons. 
    cation
    positive ions that are formed when an atom loses electrons
    ion
    atom or molecule that has gained or lost one or more of its valence electrons, giving it a net electrical charge. 
     
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