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Chemistry LibreTexts

Chapter 5: Properties of Compounds

  • Page ID
    58812
    • 5.1: Isomers
      One of the interesting aspects of organic chemistry is that it is three-dimensional. A molecule can have a shape in space that may contribute to its properties. Molecules can differ in the way the atoms are arranged - the same combination of atoms can be assembled in more than one way. These compounds are known as isomers. Isomers are molecules with the same molecular formulas, but different arrangements of atoms.
    • 5.2: Carbohydrate Structures
      Carbohydrates are organic compounds that contain only carbon (C) , hydrogen (H) , and oxygen (O) . They contain a chain of carbons, an aldehyde or a ketone, and hydroxyl groups. Every carbon atom is attached to one oxygen atom. There are thousands of different carbohydrates, but they all consist of one or more smaller units called monosaccharides.
    • 5.3: Polarity and Intermolecular Forces
      In an ionic bond, one or more electrons are transferred from one atom to another. In a covalent bond, one or more pairs of electrons are shared between atoms. However, bonding between atoms of different elements is rarely purely ionic or purely covalent.
    • 5.4: Chromatography
      When chemists have a multi-component solution which may contain traces of important chemical species, they are faced with the challenge of detecting whether these chemicals are present in solution. To deal with these difficulties, chemists employ different methods to separate solutions into their components. Two essential techniques are distillation and chromatography.
    • 5.E: Properties of Compounds (Exercises)
      These are homework exercises to accompany Chapter 5 of the University of Kentucky's LibreText for CHE 103 - Chemistry for Allied Health. Solutions are available below the questions.