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Chemistry LibreTexts

1: Hybrid Theory

  • Page ID
    409141
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    • 1.1: Hybridization
    • 1.2: Hybrid Orbitals
    • 1.3: Hybrid Atomic Orbitals
      We can use hybrid orbitals, which are mathematical combinations of some or all of the valence atomic orbitals, to describe the electron density around covalently bonded atoms. These hybrid orbitals either form sigma (σ) bonds directed toward other atoms of the molecule or contain lone pairs of electrons. We can determine the type of hybridization around a central atom from the geometry of the regions of electron density about it.


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