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4.3: The Reaction of Sodium with Chlorine

  • Page ID
    177543
  • Learning Objectives

    • Explain the bonding nature of ionic compounds.
    • Relating microscopic bonding properties to macroscopic solid properties.

    Neutral atoms and their associated ions have very different physical and chemical properties. Sodium atoms form sodium metal, a soft, silvery-white metal that burns vigorously in air and reacts explosively with water. Chlorine atoms form chlorine gas, Cl2, a yellow-green gas that is extremely corrosive to most metals and very poisonous to animals and plants. The vigorous reaction between the elements sodium and chlorine forms the white, crystalline compound sodium chloride, common table salt, which contains sodium cations and chloride anions (Figure Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\)). The compound composed of these ions exhibits properties entirely different from the properties of the elements sodium and chlorine. Chlorine is poisonous, but sodium chloride is essential to life; sodium atoms react vigorously with water, but sodium chloride simply dissolves in water.

    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\) (a) Sodium is a soft metal that must be stored in mineral oil to prevent reaction with air or water. (b) Chlorine is a pale yellow-green gas. (c) When combined, they form white crystals of sodium chloride (table salt). (credit a: modification of work by “Jurii”/Wikimedia Commons) Commons)

    Ionic Bonds

    imageedit_3_7903632767.jpg a nonmetal. As the electronic transfer occurs, both atoms will achieve more stable confirmations. The end result will be a less reactive compound. These type of species are composed of both cations and anions. In addition, they are crystalline and solid in nature. A few examples of real-world ionic compounds would be NaCl (table salt) and NaF (active ingredient in toothpaste).
    Figure \(\PageIndex{2}\) ). If sodium metal and chlorine gas mix under the right conditions, they will form salt. The sodium loses an electron, and the chlorine gains that electron. This reaction is highly favorable because of the electrostatic attraction between the particles. In the process, a great amount of light and heat is released. The resulting salt is mostly unreactive — it is stable. It will not undergo any explosive reactions, unlike the sodium and chlorine that it is made of.

    Figure \(\PageIndex{2}\) NaCl crystals.

    Image used with permission (Public Domain; NASA).

    clipboard_eb5397e6bf9ec09f5601b11262e8ad8bb.png
    Figure \(\PageIndex{3}\) The formation of sodium chloride from the attraction of sodium and chloride ions.

    The reaction is represented with Lewis dot symbols below.

    Chloride Salts

    ionic1 (2).jpg

    The sodium atom is donating its 1 valence electron to the chlorine atom. This creates a sodium cation and a chlorine anion. Notice that the net charge of the resulting compound is 0.

    References

    1. Vollhardt, K. Peter C., and Neil E. Schore. Organic Chemistry Structure and Function. New York: W. H. Freeman, 2007.
    2. Petrucci, Ralph H. General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2007.
    3. Brown, Theodore L., Eugene H. Lemay, and Bruce E. Bursten. Chemistry: The Central Science. 6th ed. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1994.

    Summary

    • An ionic bond is formed when a metal donates it(s) valence electron(s) to a nonmetal.
    • The resulting ionic compound is more stable and less reactive.

    Contributors and Attributions