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Unit 4 Pre-Assessment: The New Deal and the Start of World War II

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    187172
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    cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">In the 1930’s, the enactment of New Deal programs demonstrated a belief that</span></p>corporations were best left to operate without government interferencestate governments should give up control over commerce inside their statesthe Federal Government must concern itself with the people’s economic well-beingthe United States Constitution was not relevant to 20th-century life3100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">Critics charged that President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s plan to increase the number of Supreme Court Justices was clearly in conflict with</span></p>the Supreme Court’s practice of judicial restraintthe constitutional principle of checks and balancesattempts of Congress to limit judicial responsibilitiesefforts to restrict the number of terms a President could serve6100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">The main purpose of New Deal measures such as the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) was to</span></p>provide immediate employment opportunitiesdevelop rules to limit speculation and safeguard savingsenable the Federal Government to take over failing industriesassure a guaranteed income for American families10100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">A lasting result of the New Deal in the United States has been the</span></p>reduction of the national debtcontrol of stock prices by the Federal Governmentjoint effort of business and labor to strengthen the Presidencyassumption by the Federal Government of greater responsibility for the nation’s well-being16100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">"You cannot extend the mastery of government over the daily working life of the people without, at the same time, making it the master of the people’s souls and thought." -President Herbert Hoover The idea expressed in the quotation is a basis for President Hoover’s belief that the problems of the Great Depression could best be solved by</span></p>nationalizing major industriesrequiring business to pay a minimum wage to workersrelying mostly on private enterprise and individual initiative to improve economic conditionscreating government job programs for the unemployed19100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">A major result of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal was</span></p>a decline in the Federal deficitan expansion of the power of the Federal Governmenta change in the voting rights of women a reinstitution of the gold standard for United States currency22100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">The election of Franklin D. Roosevelt to the Presidency in 1932 reflected the desire of many Americans to</span></p>return to a policy of laissez faireabandon capitalism in favor of socialismcontinue the domestic policies of the Hoover administrationhave government take an active role in solving economic problems28100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">The effectiveness of the New Deal in ending the Great Depression is difficult to measure because</span></p>President Franklin D. Roosevelt died during his fourth termUnited States involvement in World War II rapidly accelerated economic growththe Supreme Court declared most New Deal laws unconstitutionallater Presidents failed to support most New Deal reforms30100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">Deficit spending by the Federal Government as a means of reviving the economy is based on the idea that</span></p>purchasing power will increase and economic growth will be stimulatedonly the National Government can operate businesses efficientlythe National Government should turn its revenue over to the stateslower interest rates will encourage investment33100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">When the Great Depression began in 1929, the most common economic belief supported by the Republican Party was that</span></p>an increase in defense spending would stimulate the economyunemployed workers should receive Federal unemployment benefitsthe government should assume control of industrythe economy would recover on its own40100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">Which statement is accurate about American culture during the Great Depression?</span></p>The Federal Government provided money to support the arts.Most movies featured realistic themes and unhappy endings.Rock-and-roll music became popular.Interest in professional sports declined.41100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">A major criticism of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s programs to combat the Great Depression was that these programs</span></p>reduced the power of the Federal Governmentignored the plight of homeowners with mortgagesprovided too much protection for big businessmade people dependent on the Federal Government48100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">The National Industrial Recovery Act and the National Labor Relations Act are often cited as evidence that New Deal legislation</span></p>tried to keep the costs of labor downsympathized with the interests of workersblamed unions for slowing economic recoveryfavored management over unions50100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">The New Deal changed political thinking in the United States because it supported the idea that the</span></p>rights of workers are less important than the interests of businessSupreme Court should have an important role to play in the economygovernment should become more involved in the social and economic life of the peoplepresident’s foreign policy is more important than his domestic policy55100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">Which action best illustrates the policy of isolationism followed by the United States before it entered World War II?</span></p>signing of a collective security pact with Latin American nationspassage of neutrality legislation forbidding arms sales to warring nationsembargo on the sale of gasoline and steel to JapanPresident Franklin D. Roosevelt’s exchange of American destroyers for British naval and air bases58100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">"The great rule of conduct for us in regard to foreign nations is, in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connection as possible."</span><br style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;" /><br style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;" /><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">This quotation supports a foreign policy of</span></p>imperialismappeasementneutralityeconomic sanctions63100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">In the 1930’s, the United States attempted to avoid a repetition of the events leading up to United States involvement in World War I by</span></p>establishing the Good Neighbor policy with Latin American nationsforgiving the foreign debts incurred during World War Iofficially recognizing the existence of the Soviet Unionpassing a series of neutrality laws68100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">The United States became involved in World War II primarily because</span></p>Germany refused to pay its debts from World War IEuropean democracies supported United States policies toward Germany and JapanPresident Franklin D. Roosevelt did not enforce the Neutrality ActsGermany and Japan achieved important military successes in Europe and Asia72100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="background-color: #ffffff;"><strong style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;"><em>Speaker A:</em></strong><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;">"We must take action even if we are not sure it will work. To do nothing to stop them would be a repeat of the Munich mistake."</span></span><br style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;" /><span style="background-color: #ffffff;"><strong style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;"><em>Speaker B:</em></strong><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;">"We must recognize the increasing interdependence of nations and join the United Nations."</span></span><br style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;" /><span style="background-color: #ffffff;"><strong style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;"><em>Speaker C:</em></strong><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;">"Stopping the spread of communism can and must take several forms. We must be willing to do whatever is necessary."</span></span><br style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;" /><span style="background-color: #ffffff;"><strong style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;"><em>Speaker D:</em></strong><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;">"Involvement in European affairs would be a mistake. We should not jeopardize our peace and prosperity over issues that Europe’s ambitions and rivalries control."</span></span><br style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;" /><br style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;" /><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">The "Munich mistake" mentioned by speaker A refers to a policy of</span></p>interdependenceappeasementbalance of powercollective security74100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 is an illustration of the</span></p>impact a single event can have on public opinion a time of crisiseffectiveness of a policy of appeasement in stopping aggressionsuccess of the pacifist movement in the United Statesrole of communism as a negative influence in global affairs77100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">Prior to United States entry into World War II, Congress passed the Cash-and-Carry Act of 1939 and the Lend-Lease Act of 1941. These foreign policy actions showed that the United States</span></p>gave equal support to both the Allied and Axis Powersattempted to contain the spread of communismmaintained a strict policy of isolationismbecame increasingly drawn into the war in Europe84100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">Between 1934 and 1937, Congress passed a series of neutrality acts that were designed primarily to</span></p>strengthen the nation’s military defensesprovide aid to other democratic nationscreate jobs for unemployed American workersavoid mistakes that had led to American involvement in World War I88100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">Why was the United States called the “arsenal of democracy” in 1940?</span></p>The leaders in the democratic nations of Europe were educated in the United StatesMost of the battles to defend worldwide democracy took place on American soil.The United States supervised elections in European nations before the war.The United States provided much of the weaponry needed to fight the Axis powers.92100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">At the beginning of World War II, national debate focused on whether the United States should continue the policy of</span></p>coexistencecontainmentimperialismisolationism96100cc_profilecc.multiple_choice.v0p1<p><span style="color: #000000; font-family: Times; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; background-color: #ffffff;">Before entering World War II, the United States acted as the “arsenal of democracy” by</span></p>financing overseas radio broadcasts in support of democracysupplying war materials to the Alliescreating a weapons stockpile for use after the warproviding workers for overseas factories98100