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Grammar Slammer - Writing Complete Sentences

  • Page ID
    185824
  • Grammar Slammar!

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    Introduction to Grammar Slammar!

    Throughout our course, we'll have Grammar Slammar! lessons.  These are quick grammatical reviews (you've probably learned all of this before) with the aim of helping you to improve your writing.  There are no assignments associated with these lessons, but I do expect you to review the material, take the quizzes, and then incorporate what you've learned into your writing assignments (formal and informal).

    Fragments 

    A sentence fragment is an incomplete sentence.  It may lack a subject, a verb, or both.  It might also be a subordinate clause that cannot stand alone.

    Check this out for more practice with sentence fragments:  http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/fragments.htm

    Here's a quick video on sentence fragments:

     

    Run-On Sentences

    run-on sentence is two or more complete sentences written as though they were one sentence.

    comma splice is perhaps the most common kind of run-on sentence. It occurs when two main clauses are separated by a comma rather than a semi-colon or a period.  Another kind of run-on sentence is formed when there is no punctuation between two main clauses.

    A third kind of run-on sentence is formed when there is no comma before a coordinating conjunction that joins two main clauses.

    Check out this site for more practice with run-on sentences:  http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/runons.htm

    Here's a quick video on run-on sentences (and how to avoid them!):

     

    Examples:   

    Check out each incorrect sentence below, and the information on how to correct it.

    1. Jake is planning a trip to Orlando, he will leave on Tuesday. 
      Correct by adding a coordinating conjunction such as "and," by replacing the comma with a semi-colon (;), or by making each main clause a separate sentence.

    2. The sun shone brightly the birds sand with glee.  
      Correct by adding a comma and a coordinating conjunction, by adding a semi-colon, or by making each main clause a separate sentence.

    3. Carla hoped to finish her project this afternoon but she ran out of time.  
      Correct by adding a comma before "but."
    Works Cited
    Guide to Grammar & Writing  http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/ 10 August 2012
    Image source:  http://www.ereleases.com/prfuel/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/grammar_dictionary.jpg