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Chemistry LibreTexts

1: Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy

  • Page ID
    178838
    • 1.1: Electromagnetic Radiation
    • 1.2: The Wave Theory of Light
      Water waves transmit energy through space by the periodic oscillation of matter (the water). In contrast, energy that is transmitted, or radiated, through space in the form of periodic oscillations of electric and magnetic fields is known as electromagnetic radiation, which is energy that is transmitted, or radiated, through space in the form of periodic oscillations of electric and magnetic fields.
    • 1.3: Bohr's Theory of the Hydrogen Emission Spectrum
    • 1.4: Hydrogen's Atomic Emission Spectrum
      This page introduces the atomic hydrogen emission spectrum, showing how it arises from electron movements between energy levels within the atom. It also explains how the spectrum can be used to find the ionization energy of hydrogen.
    • 1.5: The Schrödinger Wave Equation
      Beginning in the early 20th century, physicists began to acknowledge that matter--much like electromagnetic radiation--possessed wave-like behaviors. While electromagnetic radiation were well understood to obey Maxwell's Equations, matter obeyed no known equations.
    • 1.6: Particle in a One-Dimensional Box
      A particle in a 1-dimensional box is a fundamental quantum mechanical approximation describing the translational motion of a single particle confined inside an infinitely deep well from which it cannot escape.
    • 1.7: Electronic Spectroscopy
      This page explains what happens when organic compounds absorb UV or visible light, and why the wavelength of light absorbed varies from compound to compound.
    • 1.8: The Harmonic Oscillator Approximates Vibrations
      The quantum harmonic oscillator is the quantum analog of the classical harmonic oscillator and is one of the most important model systems in quantum mechanics. This is due in partially to the fact that an arbitrary potential curve V(x) can usually be approximated as a harmonic potential at the vicinity of a stable equilibrium point, it
    • 1.9: The Harmonic Oscillator and Infrared Spectra
      Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of the most common and widely used spectroscopic techniques employed mainly by inorganic and organic chemists due to its usefulness in determining structures of compounds and identifying them. Chemical compounds have different chemical properties due to the presence of different functional groups.
    • 1.10: Microwave Spectroscopy
      Microwave rotational spectroscopy uses microwave radiation to measure the energies of rotational transitions for molecules in the gas phase. It accomplishes this through the interaction of the electric dipole moment of the molecules with the electromagnetic field of the exciting microwave photon.