Skip to main content
Chemistry LibreTexts

Untitled Page 35

  • Page ID
    124019
  • Appendix

    Appendix A: Interview Questions for Instructors and Tutors

    Instructors

    1.Could you tell me just a little about yourself: where you’re at in the program, what your area of focus is, how long you’ve been teaching?

    2.So how did it go? What are your overall impressions of your experience with course-based tutoring?

    3.What worked well?

    4.What were the students’ impressions? The tutors?

    5.What roles(s) did the course-based tutor play: e.g., instruction partner, conversation participant, discussion leader?

    6.Did you require visits to the tutor?

    7.How did it compare/contrast to not having a tutor directly attached to the EOP classroom?

    8.What might have worked better? What suggestions might you offer other tutors or TAs interested in participating in this project?

    9.How did this experience affect your relationship to the Instructional Center or other writing centers?

    10.Would you collaborate with a course-based tutor again? Would you make any changes in the way you employed the tutor, to your syllabus or assignments, or in any other way?

    11.Did this experience change or add to your overall view of what it means to tutor, teach, or learn writing?

    Tutors

    1.Could you tell me just a little about yourself: where you’re at in your studies, grade level; what your major is; how long you’ve been tutoring?

    2.How did it go? What are your overall impressions of your experience with course-based tutoring?

    3.What worked well?

    4.What were the students’ impressions of your involvement with the class? The TAs?

    5.What role(s) did you play: e.g., instruction partner, conversation participant, discussion leader?

    6.How did your in-class experience compare/contrast to your experiences as a tutor one-to-one in the Center?

    7.What might have worked better? What suggestions might you offer other tutors or TAs interested in participating in this project?

    8.Did your tutor training and experience as a one-to-one tutor prepare you for this role?

    9.Would you be willing to be a course-based tutor again? What changes, if any would you make, or want to see made?

    Appendix B: Student Questionnaires

    This questionnaire asks general questions about your perspectives on interacting with an in-class tutor for this course. Participation is voluntary. You may skip any questions that you do not wish to answer. Your responses will be used to better understand the effects and potential value added by having an in-class tutor. The information you provide here is confidential. Based on your responses, we may contact you in the future to ask if you’d like to participate in a follow-up interview.

    1.Before this class, how often would you say you’ve used peer writing tutors in the past? (check one):

    Often______ Occasionally_____ Rarely______ Never_____

    Comment:

    2.What are your overall impressions of having a course-based tutor?

    3.What did you like best about having a course-based tutor?

    4.Were there any problems with having a course-based tutor?

    5.How did this compare to not having a course-based tutor in English 104? [Only for UW case studies]

    6.Do you feel that you saw or visited a tutor more or less often than in English 104? [Only for UW case studies]

    7.Did you visit your tutor for a one-to-one tutorial? How did this compare to your in-class interactions?

    8.Do you think that you will continue to talk to writing tutors in the future?

    Appendix C: Linguistic Features and Cues of One-to-One Tutorials for Teams One-Four

    Ling. Feat. and Cues

    Julian

    Team One

    Students

    Megan

    Team Two

    Students

    # of Sessions

    6

    8/7

    Average Length (minutes)

    36

    11/18

    Total Words Spoken

    15,049

    5,835

    8,986/

    11,675

    2,150/

    2,444

    Average # of Words Spoken per Minute

    70

    27

    102/93

    24/19

    Content-clarifying Questions

    20

    15/18

    Open-ended Questions

    93

    12/8

    Directive Questions

    8

    5/12

    References to TA

    14

    13

    7/17

    2/6

    References to Assignment Prompt

    12

    1

    1/1

    0/0

    Interruptions

    28

    13

    8/17

    26/20

    Main Channel Overlaps

    1

    4

    1/8

    5/22

    Joint Productions

    4

    9

    3/8

    17/23

    Ling. Feat. and Cues

    Madeleine

    Team Three

    Students

    Sam

    Team Four

    Students

    # of Sessions

    3/1

    11

    Average Length (minutes)

    50/59

    25

    Total Words Spoken

    12,115/

    7,614

    1,919/

    2,997

    18,181

    11,292

    Average # of Words Spoken per Minute

    81/129

    13/51

    66

    41

    Content-clarifying Questions

    5/4

    20

    Open-ended Questions

    23/2

    137

    Directive Questions

    23/5

    21

    References to TA

    7/4

    0/2

    1

    3

    References to Assignment Prompt

    1/0

    0/1

    1

    0

    Interruptions

    21/44

    10/50

    12

    37

    Main Channel Overlaps

    3/6

    7/25

    7

    12

    Joint Productions

    3/5

    24/6

    9

    49

    Appendix D: American Dream Museum Exhibit Assignment

    The American Dream Museum Exhibit

    Your team has been asked to create an exhibition that communicates the essence of the American Dream.

    Your job is to collect artifacts—images, music, literature, poems, or other items that represent or symbolize the idea behind the American Dream. Use your imagination and have fun!

    Each team member must collect 10 items and bring them in for discussion with the other team members. You should be able to make an argument about why you believe each artifact should be in the exhibition. Then, the team should choose five objects from each person’s collection. Take notes about why those items were selected as representatives of the American Dream.

    The format of your exhibit is limitless—your team (if everyone can agree) can have an overarching theme such as “Unrealistic Expectations? Women and the American Dream” or “His Way and the American Way: Music and Images of Frank Sinatra” or you can have a hodge-podge collection of items. The important thing to remember is that you must be able to make the argument that your exhibition says something about some aspect of the American Dream.

    1.At some point before the exhibit, decide on a title of your exhibition—be creative!

    2.Each individual team member will write a one to two page argument about each of their (5) artifacts and why they are important representations of the American Dream. For example, if you are writing about an image, you might do a textual analysis of the image—the subject, composition of the elements, colors, etc. If you selected a song or other music, you might show how the music or lyrics represent the American Dream. Try to make connections and/or cite some of the material we’ve covered in class.

    3.Each team member will also write a one or two page introduction to the exhibit. Be sure to define the “American Dream.” (We created a definition in class and our reading materials also defined it.) This introduction should provide an overview of the exhibit and why the audience should be interested in it. Look over all our material from this semester—the founding documents, speeches, and essays. Again, try to connect and/or cite some of the material we’ve covered in class.

    4.Finally, each team will give a tour of their exhibit and provide information about their artifacts.

    Due Dates:

    Thurs—04/15 Each person brings in 10 artifacts—Teams discuss and narrow down each person to 5

    Thurs—04/22 Each team member brings in and reads their arguments about each of their artifacts

    Thurs—04/29 Teams work on the design and order of their artifacts and presentation

    Tues—05/04 Group Project Presentations

    Thur—05/06 Group Project Presentations