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Chapter 18.0: Introduction

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    42868
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    Prince George's Community College
    General Chemistry for Engineering
    CHM 2000

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    Unit I: Atoms      Unit II: Molecules     Unit III: States of Matter     Unit IV: Reactions     Unit V: Kinetics & Equilibrium
    Unit VI: Thermo & Electrochemistry
         Unit VII: Nuclear Chemistry

    Until now, you have studied chemical processes in which atoms share or transfer electrons to form new compounds, leaving the atomic nuclei largely unaffected. In this chapter, we examine some properties of the atomic nucleus and the changes that can occur in atomic nuclei.

    Nuclear reactions differ from other chemical processes in one critical way: in a nuclear reaction, the identities of the elements change. In addition, nuclear reactions are often accompanied by the release of enormous amounts of energy, as much as a billion times more than the energy released by chemical reactions. Moreover, the yields and rates of a nuclear reaction are generally unaffected by changes in temperature, pressure, or the presence of a catalyst.

    We begin by examining the structure of the atomic nucleus and the factors that determine whether a particular nucleus is stable or decays spontaneously to another element. We then discuss the major kinds of nuclear decay reactions, as well as the properties and uses of the radiation emitted when nuclei decay. You will learn how radioactive emissions can be used to study the mechanisms of chemical reactions and biological processes and how to calculate the amount of energy released during a nuclear reaction. You will also discover why houses are tested for radon gas, how radiation is used to probe organs such as the brain, and how the energy from nuclear reactions can be harnessed to produce electricity. Last, we explore the nuclear chemistry that takes place in stars, and we describe the role that stars play in producing most of the elements in the universe.

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    The glow caused by intense radiation. The high-energy particles ejected into the surrounding water or air by an intense radioactive source such as this nuclear reactor core produce a ghostly bluish glow.

    Contributors

    • Anonymous

    Modified by Joshua Halpern (Howard University), Scott Sinex, and Scott Johnson (PGCC)

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