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Chemistry LibreTexts

2.3: Calculating Atomic Masses

  • Page ID
    217247
  • Skills to Develop

    • Define the atomic mass unit and average atomic mass
    • Calculate average atomic mass and isotopic abundance
    • Define the amount unit mole and the related quantity Avogadro’s number
    • Explain the relation between mass, moles, and numbers of atoms or molecules, and perform calculations deriving these quantities from one another

    Video \(\PageIndex{1}\): A review of counting subatomic particles and a preview of isotopes and relative atomic mass.

     

    Isotopes

    The symbol for a specific isotope of any element is written by placing the mass number as a superscript to the left of the element symbol (Figure \(\PageIndex{4}\)). The atomic number is sometimes written as a subscript preceding the symbol, but since this number defines the element’s identity, as does its symbol, it is often omitted. For example, magnesium exists as a mixture of three isotopes, each with an atomic number of 12 and with mass numbers of 24, 25, and 26, respectively. These isotopes can be identified as 24Mg, 25Mg, and 26Mg. These isotope symbols are read as “element, mass number” and can be symbolized consistent with this reading. For instance, 24Mg is read as “magnesium 24,” and can be written as “magnesium-24” or “Mg-24.” 25Mg is read as “magnesium 25,” and can be written as “magnesium-25” or “Mg-25.” All magnesium atoms have 12 protons in their nucleus. They differ only because a 24Mg atom has 12 neutrons in its nucleus, a 25Mg atom has 13 neutrons, and a 26Mg has 14 neutrons.

    This diagram shows the symbol for helium, “H e.” The number to the upper left of the symbol is the mass number, which is 4. The number to the upper right of the symbol is the charge which is positive 2. The number to the lower left of the symbol is the atomic number, which is 2. This number is often omitted. Also shown is “M g” which stands for magnesium It has a mass number of 24, a charge of positive 2, and an atomic number of 12.

    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): The symbol for an atom indicates the element via its usual two-letter symbol, the mass number as a left superscript, the atomic number as a left subscript (sometimes omitted), and the charge as a right superscript.

    Information about the naturally occurring isotopes of elements with atomic numbers 1 through 10 is given in Table \(\PageIndex{2}\). Note that in addition to standard names and symbols, the isotopes of hydrogen are often referred to using common names and accompanying symbols. Hydrogen-2, symbolized 2H, is also called deuterium and sometimes symbolized D. Hydrogen-3, symbolized 3H, is also called tritium and sometimes symbolized T.

    Table \(\PageIndex{1}\): Nuclear Compositions of Atoms of the Very Light Elements
    Element Symbol Atomic Number Number of Protons Number of Neutrons Mass (amu) % Natural Abundance
    hydrogen \(\ce{^1_1H}\)
    (protium)
    1 1 0 1.0078 99.989
    \(\ce{^2_1H}\)
    (deuterium)
    1 1 1 2.0141 0.0115
    \(\ce{^3_1H}\)
    (tritium)
    1 1 2 3.01605 — (trace)
    helium \(\ce{^3_2He}\) 2 2 1 3.01603 0.00013
    \(\ce{^4_2He}\) 2 2 2 4.0026 100
    lithium \(\ce{^6_3Li}\) 3 3 3 6.0151 7.59
    \(\ce{^7_3Li}\) 3 3 4 7.0160 92.41
    beryllium \(\ce{^9_4Be}\) 4 4 5 9.0122 100
    boron \(\ce{^{10}_5B}\) 5 5 5 10.0129 19.9
    \(\ce{^{11}_5B}\) 5 5 6 11.0093 80.1
    carbon \(\ce{^{12}_6C}\) 6 6 6 12.0000 98.89
    \(\ce{^{13}_6C}\) 6 6 7 13.0034 1.11
    \(\ce{^{14}_6C}\) 6 6 8 14.0032 — (trace)
    nitrogen \(\ce{^{14}_7N}\) 7 7 7 14.0031 99.63
    \(\ce{^{15}_7N}\) 7 7 8 15.0001 0.37
    oxygen \(\ce{^{16}_8O}\) 8 8 8 15.9949 99.757
    \(\ce{^{17}_8O}\) 8 8 9 16.9991 0.038
    \(\ce{^{18}_8O}\) 8 8 10 17.9992 0.205
    fluorine \(\ce{^{19}_9F}\) 9 9 10 18.9984 100
    neon \(\ce{^{20}_{10}Ne}\) 10 10 10 19.9924 90.48
    \(\ce{^{21}_{10}Ne}\) 10 10 11 20.9938 0.27
    \(\ce{^{22}_{10}Ne}\) 10 10 12 21.9914 9.25

    Use this Build an Atom simulator to build atoms of the first 10 elements, see which isotopes exist, check nuclear stability, and gain experience with isotope symbols.

    Atomic Mass

    Because each proton and each neutron contribute approximately one amu to the mass of an atom, and each electron contributes far less, the atomic mass of a single atom is approximately equal to its mass number (a whole number). However, the average masses of atoms of most elements are not whole numbers because most elements exist naturally as mixtures of two or more isotopes.

    The mass of an element shown in a periodic table or listed in a table of atomic masses is a weighted, average mass of all the isotopes present in a naturally occurring sample of that element. This is equal to the sum of each individual isotope’s mass multiplied by its fractional abundance.

    \[\mathrm{average\: mass}=\sum_{i}(\mathrm{fractional\: abundance\times isotopic\: mass})_i\]

    For example, the element boron is composed of two isotopes: About 19.9% of all boron atoms are 10B with a mass of 10.0129 amu, and the remaining 80.1% are 11B with a mass of 11.0093 amu. The average atomic mass for boron is calculated to be:

    \[\begin{align*}
    \textrm{boron average mass} &=\mathrm{(0.199\times10.0129\: amu)+(0.801\times11.0093\: amu)}\\
    &=\mathrm{1.99\: amu+8.82\: amu}\\
    &=\mathrm{10.81\: amu}
    \end{align*}\]

    It is important to understand that no single boron atom weighs exactly 10.8 amu; 10.8 amu is the average mass of all boron atoms, and individual boron atoms weigh either approximately 10 amu or 11 amu.

    Example \(\PageIndex{1}\): Calculation of Average Atomic Mass

    A meteorite found in central Indiana contains traces of the noble gas neon picked up from the solar wind during the meteorite’s trip through the solar system. Analysis of a sample of the gas showed that it consisted of 91.84% 20Ne (mass 19.9924 amu), 0.47% 21Ne (mass 20.9940 amu), and 7.69% 22Ne (mass 21.9914 amu). What is the average mass of the neon in the solar wind?

    Solution

    \[\begin{align*}
    \mathrm{average\: mass} &=\mathrm{(0.9184\times19.9924\: amu)+(0.0047\times20.9940\: amu)+(0.0769\times21.9914\: amu)}\\
    &=\mathrm{(18.36+0.099+1.69)\:amu}\\
    &=\mathrm{20.15\: amu}
    \end{align*}\]

    The average mass of a neon atom in the solar wind is 20.15 amu. (The average mass of a terrestrial neon atom is 20.1796 amu. This result demonstrates that we may find slight differences in the natural abundance of isotopes, depending on their origin.)

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{1}\)

    A sample of magnesium is found to contain 78.70% of 24Mg atoms (mass 23.98 amu), 10.13% of 25Mg atoms (mass 24.99 amu), and 11.17% of 26Mg atoms (mass 25.98 amu). Calculate the average mass of a Mg atom.

    Answer

    24.31 amu

    We can also do variations of this type of calculation, as shown in the next example.

    Example \(\PageIndex{2}\): Calculation of Percent Abundance

    Naturally occurring chlorine consists of 35Cl (mass 34.96885 amu) and 37Cl (mass 36.96590 amu), with an average mass of 35.453 amu. What is the percent composition of Cl in terms of these two isotopes?

    Solution

    The average mass of chlorine is the fraction that is 35Cl times the mass of 35Cl plus the fraction that is 37Cl times the mass of 37Cl.

    \[\mathrm{average\: mass=(fraction\: of\: ^{35}Cl\times mass\: of\: ^{35}Cl)+(fraction\: of\: ^{37}Cl\times mass\: of\: ^{37}Cl)}\]

    If we let x represent the fraction that is 35Cl, then the fraction that is 37Cl is represented by 1.00 − x.

    (The fraction that is 35Cl + the fraction that is 37Cl must add up to 1, so the fraction of 37Cl must equal 1.00 − the fraction of 35Cl.)

    Substituting this into the average mass equation, we have:

    \[\begin{align*}
    \mathrm{35.453\: amu} &=(x\times 34.96885\: \ce{amu})+[(1.00-x)\times 36.96590\: \ce{amu}]\\
    35.453 &=34.96885x+36.96590-36.96590x\\
    1.99705x &=1.513\\
    x&=\dfrac{1.513}{1.99705}=0.7576
    \end{align*}\]

    So solving yields: x = 0.7576, which means that 1.00 − 0.7576 = 0.2424. Therefore, chlorine consists of 75.76% 35Cl and 24.24% 37Cl.

    Exercise \(\PageIndex{2}\)

    Naturally occurring copper consists of 63Cu (mass 62.9296 amu) and 65Cu (mass 64.9278 amu), with an average mass of 63.546 amu. What is the percent composition of Cu in terms of these two isotopes?

    Answer

    69.15% Cu-63 and 30.85% Cu-65

     

     

    Summary

    Video \(\PageIndex{6}\): Watch this video for a review of relative atomic mass and isotopes.

    An atom consists of a small, positively charged nucleus surrounded by electrons. The nucleus contains protons and neutrons; its diameter is about 100,000 times smaller than that of the atom. The mass of one atom is usually expressed in atomic mass units (amu), which is referred to as the atomic mass. An amu is defined as exactly \(1/12\) of the mass of a carbon-12 atom and is equal to 1.6605 \(\times\) 10−24 g.

    Protons are relatively heavy particles with a charge of 1+ and a mass of 1.0073 amu. Neutrons are relatively heavy particles with no charge and a mass of 1.0087 amu. Electrons are light particles with a charge of 1− and a mass of 0.00055 amu. The number of protons in the nucleus is called the atomic number (Z) and is the property that defines an atom’s elemental identity. The sum of the numbers of protons and neutrons in the nucleus is called the mass number and, expressed in amu, is approximately equal to the mass of the atom. An atom is neutral when it contains equal numbers of electrons and protons.

    Isotopes of an element are atoms with the same atomic number but different mass numbers; isotopes of an element, therefore, differ from each other only in the number of neutrons within the nucleus. When a naturally occurring element is composed of several isotopes, the atomic mass of the element represents the average of the masses of the isotopes involved. A chemical symbol identifies the atoms in a substance using symbols, which are one-, two-, or three-letter abbreviations for the atoms.

    Looking Beyond

    Video \(\PageIndex{7}\): Remember our exploration into the size of an atom last week? This video goes deeper into investigating the size of the subatomic particles we just discussed.

    Footnotes

    1. Read more about the redefinition of SI units including the kilogram here (Laura Howe, CE&N, Nov. 16, 2018).

    Key Equations

    • \(\mathrm{average\: mass}=\sum_{i}(\mathrm{fractional\: abundance \times isotopic\: mass})_i\)

    Glossary

    anion
    negatively charged atom or molecule (contains more electrons than protons)
    atomic mass
    average mass of atoms of an element, expressed in amu
    atomic mass unit (amu)
    (also, unified atomic mass unit, u, or Dalton, Da) unit of mass equal to \(\dfrac{1}{12}\) of the mass of a 12C atom
    atomic number (Z)
    number of protons in the nucleus of an atom
    cation
    positively charged atom or molecule (contains fewer electrons than protons)
    chemical symbol
    one-, two-, or three-letter abbreviation used to represent an element or its atoms
    Dalton (Da)
    alternative unit equivalent to the atomic mass unit
    fundamental unit of charge
    (also called the elementary charge) equals the magnitude of the charge of an electron (e) with e = 1.602 \(\times\) 10−19 C
    ion
    electrically charged atom or molecule (contains unequal numbers of protons and electrons)
    mass number (A)
    sum of the numbers of neutrons and protons in the nucleus of an atom
    mole
    amount of substance containing the same number of atoms, molecules, ions, or other entities as the number of atoms in exactly 12 grams of 12C
    molar mass
    mass in grams of 1 mole of a substance
    unified atomic mass unit (u)
    alternative unit equivalent to the atomic mass unit

    Contributors

    • Paul Flowers (University of North Carolina - Pembroke), Klaus Theopold (University of Delaware) and Richard Langley (Stephen F. Austin State University) with contributing authors. Textbook content produced by OpenStax College is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 license. Download for free at http://cnx.org/contents/85abf193-2bd...a7ac8df6@9.110).

    • Adelaide Clark, Oregon Institute of Technology
    • Fuse School, Open Educational Resource free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC (View License Deed: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/)
    • Crash Course Chemistry, Crash Course is a division of Complexly and videos are free to stream for educational purposes.
    • TED-Ed’s commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED’s mission of spreading great ideas. Within TED-Ed’s growing library of TED-Ed animations, you will find carefully curated educational videos, many of which represent collaborations between talented educators and animators nominated through the TED-Ed website.