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Chemistry LibreTexts

3.18: Temperature and Heat

  • Page ID
    209987
  • Learning Objectives

    • Identify the different between temperature and heat.
    • Recognize the different scales used to measure temperature

    The concept of temperature may seem familiar to you, but many people confuse temperature with heat. Temperature is a measurement of how hot or cold an object is relative to another object (its thermal energy content). We can measure temperature in the laboratory. Heat is the flow of thermal energy between objects with different temperatures. Temperature is a measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles in matter. In everyday usage, temperature indicates a measure of how hot or cold an object is. Temperature is an important parameter in chemistry. When a substance changes from solid to liquid, it is because there was in increase in the temperature of the material. Chemical reactions usually proceed faster if the temperature is increased. Many unstable materials (such as enzymes) will be viable longer at lower temperatures.

    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): The glowing charcoal on the left represents high kinetic energy, while the snow and ice on the right are of much lower kinetic energy.

    Three different scales are commonly used to measure temperature: Fahrenheit (expressed as °F), Celsius (°C), and Kelvin (K). Thermometers measure temperature by using materials that expand or contract when heated or cooled. Mercury or alcohol thermometers, for example, have a reservoir of liquid that expands when heated and contracts when cooled, so the liquid column lengthens or shortens as the temperature of the liquid changes.

    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): A Comparison of the Fahrenheit, Celsius, and Kelvin Temperature Scales. Because the difference between the freezing point of water and the boiling point of water is 100° on both the Celsius and Kelvin scales, the size of a degree Celsius (°C) and a kelvin (K) are precisely the same. In contrast, both a degree Celsius and a kelvin are 9/5 the size of a degree Fahrenheit (°F). (CC BY-SA-NC 3.0; anonymous)

     

    Summary

    Three different scales are commonly used to measure temperature: Fahrenheit (expressed as °F), Celsius (°C), and Kelvin (K).

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