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    299346
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    Different spectroscopies give you different perspectives. Linear spectroscopy commonly refers to light-matter interaction with one primary incident radiation field which is weak, and can be treated as a linear response between the incident light and the matter. From a quantum mechanical view of the light field, it is often conceived as a “one photon in/one photon out” measurement. Nonlinear spectroscopy is used to refer to cases that fall outside this view.
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