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Chemistry LibreTexts

1.5: Describing Chemical Bonds - Valence Bond Theory

  • Page ID
    31372
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    Objectives

    After completing this section, you should be able to

    1. explain how covalent bonds are formed as a result of the ability of atoms to share electrons.
    2. describe the formation of covalent bonds in terms of the overlapping of atomic orbitals.
    Key Terms

    Make certain that you can define, and use in context, the key terms below.

    • bond strength
    • covalent bond
    • bond length
    • sigma (σ) bond
    • pi (π) bond
    • valence bond theory

    Valence Bond Theory

    As we have been discussing how to use Lewis structures to depict the bonding in organic compounds, we have been very vague so far in our language about the actual nature of the chemical bonds themselves. We know that a covalent bond involves the ‘sharing’ of a pair of electrons between two atoms – but how does this happen, and how does it lead to the formation of a bond holding the two atoms together? Two main models have been developed to described how covalent bonds are formed: valence bond theory and molecularly orbital theory.

    Valence bond theory is most often used to describe bonding in organic molecules. In this model, covalent bonds are considered to form from the overlap of two atomic orbitals on different atoms, each orbital containing a single electron. The electrons become paired in the orbital overlap bonding the atoms together.

    The simplest example valence bond theory can be demonstrated by the H2 molecule. We can see from the periodic table that each hydrogen atom has a single valence electron. If 2 hydrogen atoms come together to form a bond, then each hydrogen atom effectively has a share in both electrons and thus each resembles the noble gas helium and is more stable. The 2 electrons shared in the orbital overlap are represented by a single dash between the atoms.

    Two hydrogen atoms react to form a hydrogen molecule. Lewis dot structure and bond line drawing of H2.

    Valence bond theory describes a chemical bond as the overlap of atomic orbitals. In the case of the hydrogen molecule, the 1s orbital of one hydrogen atom overlaps with the 1s orbital of the second hydrogen atom to form a molecular orbital called a sigma bond which contains two electrons of opposite spin. The mutual attraction between this negatively charged electron pair and the two atoms’ positively charged nuclei serves to physically link the two atoms through a force we define as a covalent bond. The strength of a covalent bond depends on the extent of overlap of the orbitals involved. Orbitals that overlap extensively form bonds that are stronger than those that have less overlap.