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  • Page ID
    359812
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    Overview

    Title: Map: Introductory Chemistry (Tro)

    Webpages: 191

    Applicable Restrictions: Noncommercial

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    By Page

    • Map: Introductory Chemistry (Tro)Undeclared
      • Front MatterUndeclared
      • 1: The Chemical WorldUndeclared
      • 2: Measurement and Problem SolvingUndeclared
        • 2.1: Taking MeasurementsUndeclared
        • 2.2: Scientific Notation - Writing Large and Small NumbersUndeclared
        • 2.3: Significant Figures - Writing Numbers to Reflect PrecisionCC BY-NC-SA 4.0
        • 2.4: Significant Figures in CalculationsUndeclared
        • 2.5: The Basic Units of MeasurementCC BY-NC 4.0
        • 2.6: Problem Solving and Unit ConversionsCC BY-NC 4.0
        • 2.7: Solving Multi-step Conversion ProblemsUndeclared
        • 2.8: Units Raised to a PowerUndeclared
        • 2.9: DensityUndeclared
        • 2.E: Measurement and Problem Solving (Exercises)Undeclared
      • 3: Matter and EnergyUndeclared
        • 3.1: In Your RoomUndeclared
        • 3.2: What is Matter?Undeclared
        • 3.3: Classifying Matter According to Its State—Solid, Liquid, and GasUndeclared
        • 3.4: Classifying Matter According to Its CompositionUndeclared
        • 3.5: Differences in Matter- Physical and Chemical PropertiesUndeclared
        • 3.6: Changes in Matter - Physical and Chemical ChangesUndeclared
        • 3.7: Conservation of Mass - There is No New MatterUndeclared
        • 3.8: EnergyUndeclared
        • 3.9: Energy and Chemical and Physical ChangeUndeclared
        • 3.10: Temperature - Random Motion of Molecules and AtomsUndeclared
        • 3.11: Temperature Changes - Heat CapacityUndeclared
        • 3.12: Energy and Heat Capacity CalculationsUndeclared
        • 3.E: Matter and Energy (Exercises)Undeclared
      • 4: Atoms and ElementsUndeclared
        • 4.1: Cutting Aluminum until you get AtomsUndeclared
        • 4.2: Indivisible - The Atomic TheoryCC BY-NC 4.0
        • 4.3: The Nuclear AtomUndeclared
        • 4.4: The Properties of Protons, Neutrons, and ElectronsUndeclared
        • 4.5: Elements- Defined by Their Number of ProtonsUndeclared
        • 4.6: Looking for Patterns - The Periodic TableCC BY-NC-SA 4.0
        • 4.7: Ions - Losing and Gaining ElectronsUndeclared
        • 4.8: Isotopes - When the Number of Neutrons VariesUndeclared
        • 4.9: Atomic Mass - The Average Mass of an Element’s AtomsUndeclared
      • 5: Molecules and CompoundsUndeclared
        • 5.1: Sugar and SaltUndeclared
        • 5.2: Compounds Display Constant CompositionUndeclared
        • 5.3: Chemical Formulas - How to Represent CompoundsUndeclared
        • 5.4: A Molecular View of Elements and CompoundsUndeclared
        • 5.5: Writing Formulas for Ionic CompoundsUndeclared
        • 5.6: Nomenclature- Naming CompoundsUndeclared
        • 5.7: Naming Ionic CompoundsUndeclared
        • 5.8: Naming Molecular CompoundsUndeclared
        • 5.9: Naming AcidsCC BY-NC 4.0
        • 5.10: Nomenclature SummaryUndeclared
        • 5.11: Formula Mass- The Mass of a Molecule or Formula UnitUndeclared
      • 6: Chemical CompositionUndeclared
        • 6.1: Prelude to Chemical Composition - How Much Sodium?Undeclared
        • 6.2: Counting Nails by the PoundUndeclared
        • 6.3: Counting Atoms by the GramUndeclared
        • 6.4: Counting Molecules by the GramUndeclared
        • 6.5: Chemical Formulas as Conversion FactorsUndeclared
        • 6.6: Mass Percent Composition of CompoundsUndeclared
        • 6.7: Mass Percent Composition from a Chemical FormulaUndeclared
        • 6.8: Calculating Empirical Formulas for CompoundsUndeclared
        • 6.9: Calculating Molecular Formulas for CompoundsUndeclared
      • 7: Chemical ReactionsUndeclared
        • 7.1: Grade School Volcanoes, Automobiles, and Laundry DetergentsUndeclared
        • 7.2: Evidence of a Chemical ReactionUndeclared
        • 7.3: Chemical EquationsUndeclared
        • 7.4: How to Write Balanced Chemical EquationsUndeclared
        • 7.5: Aqueous Solutions and Solubility - Compounds Dissolved in WaterUndeclared
        • 7.6: Precipitation ReactionsUndeclared
        • 7.7: Writing Chemical Equations for Reactions in Solution- Molecular, Complete Ionic, and Net Ionic EquationsUndeclared
        • 7.8: Acid–Base and Gas Evolution ReactionsUndeclared
        • 7.9: Oxidation–Reduction ReactionsCC BY-NC 4.0
        • 7.10: Classifying Chemical ReactionsUndeclared
        • 7.11: The Activity Series- Predicting Spontaneous Redox ReactionsUndeclared
      • 8: Quantities in Chemical ReactionsUndeclared
        • 8.1: Climate Change - Too Much Carbon DioxideUndeclared
        • 8.2: StoichiometryCC BY-NC 4.0
        • 8.3: Mole-to-Mole ConversionsUndeclared
        • 8.4: Limiting Reactant and Theoretical YieldCC BY-NC-SA 4.0
        • 8.5: Making Molecules- Mole to Mass (or vice versa) and Mass-to-Mass ConversionsUndeclared
        • 8.6: Limiting Reactant, Theoretical Yield, and Percent Yield from Initial Masses of ReactantsUndeclared
        • 8.7: Enthalpy Change is a Measure of the Heat Evolved or AbsorbedUndeclared
      • 9: Electrons in Atoms and the Periodic TableUndeclared
        • 9.1: Blimps, Balloons, and Models of the AtomUndeclared
        • 9.2: Light is Visible Electromagnetic RadiationCC BY-NC 4.0
        • 9.3: The Electromagnetic SpectrumCC BY-NC 4.0
        • 9.4: The Bohr Model - Atoms with OrbitsUndeclared
        • 9.5: The Quantum-Mechanical Model- Atoms with OrbitalsUndeclared
        • 9.6: Quantum-Mechanical Orbitals and Electron ConfigurationsUndeclared
        • 9.7: Electron Configurations and the Periodic TableUndeclared
        • 9.8: The Explanatory Power of the Quantum-Mechanical ModelUndeclared
        • 9.9: Periodic Trends - Atomic Size, Ionization Energy, and Metallic CharacterUndeclared
        • 9.E: Electrons in Atoms and the Periodic Table (Exercises)Undeclared
      • 10: Chemical BondingUndeclared
        • 10.1: Representing Valence Electrons with DotsUndeclared
        • 10.2: Lewis Structures of Ionic Compounds- Electrons TransferredUndeclared
        • 10.3: Covalent Lewis Structures- Electrons SharedUndeclared
        • 10.4: Writing Lewis Structures for Covalent CompoundsUndeclared
        • 10.5: Resonance - Equivalent Lewis Structures for the Same MoleculeUndeclared
        • 10.6: Predicting the Shapes of MoleculesUndeclared
        • 10.7: Electronegativity and Polarity - Why Oil and Water Don’t MixUndeclared
      • 11: GasesUndeclared
        • 11.1: Extra-Long StrawsCC BY-SA 4.0
        • 11.2: Kinetic Molecular Theory- A Model for GasesUndeclared
        • 11.3: Pressure - The Result of Constant Molecular CollisionsUndeclared
        • 11.4: The Combined Gas Law- Pressure, Volume, and TemperatureUndeclared
        • 11.5: The Ideal Gas Law- Pressure, Volume, Temperature, and MolesUndeclared
        • 11.6: Mixtures of Gases - Why Deep-Sea Divers Breathe a Mixture of Helium and OxygenUndeclared
        • 11.7: Gases in Chemical ReactionsUndeclared
        • 11.8: Boyle’s Law - Pressure and VolumeUndeclared
        • 11.9: Charles’s Law- Volume and TemperatureUndeclared
        • 11.10: Gay-Lussac's Law- Temperature and PressureCC BY-NC 4.0
        • 11.11: Avogadro’s Law- Volume and MolesUndeclared
      • 12: Liquids, Solids, and Intermolecular ForcesUndeclared
        • 12.1: Interactions between MoleculesUndeclared
        • 12.2: Properties of Liquids and SolidsUndeclared
        • 12.3: Surface Tension and ViscosityUndeclared
        • 12.4: Evaporation and CondensationUndeclared
        • 12.5: Melting, Freezing, and SublimationCC BY-NC 4.0
        • 12.6: Intermolecular Forces- Dispersion, Dipole–Dipole, Hydrogen Bonding, and Ion-DipoleUndeclared
        • 12.7: Types of Crystalline SolidsUndeclared
        • 12.8: Water - A Remarkable MoleculeUndeclared
      • 13: SolutionsUndeclared
      • 14: Acids and BasesUndeclared
        • 14.1: Prelude - Sour Patch KidsCC BY-SA 4.0
        • 14.1: Prelude - Sour Patch KidsCC BY-SA 4.0
        • 14.2: Acids- Properties and ExamplesUndeclared
        • 14.3: Bases- Properties and ExamplesUndeclared
        • 14.4: Molecular Definitions of Acids and BasesUndeclared
        • 14.5: Reactions of Acids and BasesUndeclared
        • 14.7: Strong and Weak Acids and BasesUndeclared
        • 14.8: Water - Acid and Base in OneUndeclared
        • 14.9: Buffers are Solutions that Resist pH ChangeCC BY-NC-SA 4.0
        • 14.9: The pH and pOH Scales - Ways to Express Acidity and BasicityUndeclared
        • 14.10: Acid–Base TitrationUndeclared
      • 15: Chemical EquilibriumUndeclared
        • 15.1: Life is Controlled DisequilibriumUndeclared
        • 15.2: The Rate of a Chemical ReactionUndeclared
        • 15.3: The Idea of Dynamic Chemical EquilibriumUndeclared
        • 15.4: The Equilibrium Constant - A Measure of How Far a Reaction GoesUndeclared
        • 15.5: Heterogeneous Equilibria- The Equilibrium Expression for Reactions Involving a Solid or a LiquidUndeclared
        • 15.6: Calculating and Using Equilibrium ConstantsUndeclared
        • 15.7: The Effect of a Concentration Change on EquilibriumUndeclared
        • 15.9: The Effect of a Volume Change on EquilibriumUndeclared
        • 15.10: The Effect of Temperature Changes on EquilibriumUndeclared
        • 15.11: The Solubility-Product ConstantUndeclared
        • 15.12: Disturbing a Reaction at Equilibrium- Le Châtelier’s PrincipleUndeclared
        • 15.12: The Path of a Reaction and the Effect of a CatalystUndeclared
      • 16: Oxidation and ReductionUndeclared
        • 16.1: The End of the Internal Combustion Engine?Undeclared
        • 16.2: Oxidation and Reduction- Some DefinitionsUndeclared
        • 16.3: Oxidation States - Electron BookkeepingUndeclared
        • 16.4: Balancing Redox EquationsUndeclared
        • 16.5: The Activity Series- Predicting Spontaneous Redox ReactionsUndeclared
        • 16.6: Batteries- Using Chemistry to Generate ElectricityUndeclared
        • 16.7: Corrosion - Undesirable Redox ReactionsUndeclared
        • 16.7: Electrolysis- Using Electricity to Do ChemistryUndeclared
      • 17: Radioactivity and Nuclear ChemistryUndeclared
        • 17.1: Diagnosing AppendicitisUndeclared
        • 17.2: The Discovery of RadioactivityUndeclared
        • 17.3: Types of Radioactivity- Alpha, Beta, and Gamma DecayUndeclared
        • 17.4: Detecting RadioactivityUndeclared
        • 17.5: Natural Radioactivity and Half-LifeUndeclared
        • 17.6: Radiocarbon Dating- Using Radioactivity to Measure the Age of Fossils and Other ArtifactsUndeclared
        • 17.7: The Discovery of Fission and the Atomic BombUndeclared
        • 17.8: Nuclear Power- Using Fission to Generate ElectricityUndeclared
        • 17.9: Nuclear Fusion- The Power of the SunUndeclared
        • 17.10: The Effects of Radiation on LifeCC BY 4.0
        • 17.11: Radioactivity in MedicineUndeclared
      • Back MatterUndeclared
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