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Chemistry LibreTexts

References

  1. The Merck Index, 11th Ed., P. 538, #3415 (1988).
  2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dopamine
  3. http://www.neuroscience.unc.edu/rese...e/dopamine.htm
  4. B. Jill Venton, R. Mark Wightman, Psychoanalytical Electrochemistry: Dopamine and Behavior, Anal. Chem. 75 (2003) 414A-421A.
  5. J. A. Stanford, J. B. Justice, Jr., “Probing Brain Chemistry: Voltammetry Comes of Age”, Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 96 (1996) 359A-366A
  6. R. S. Nicholson, Semiempirical Procedure for Measuring with Stationary Electrode Polarography Rates of Chemical Reactions Involving the Product of Electron Transfer, Anal. Chem., 38 (1966) 1406.
  7. R. S. Nicholson, I. Shain, Theory of Stationary Electrode Polarography Single Scan and Cyclic Methods Applied to Reversible, Irreversible, and Kinetic Systems, Anal. Chem., 36 (1964) 706-723.
  8. M.D. Hawley, S.V. Tatawawadi, S. Pierkarski, R. N. Adams, Electrochemical Studies of the Oxidation Pathways of Catecholamines, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 89 (1967) 447-450.

General References

  1. W. E. Geiger, "Instructional Examples of Electrode Mechanisms in Transition Metal Complexes," in Laboratory Techniques in Electroanalytical Chemistry, 2nd Ed., Editors P. T. Kissinger and W. R. Heineman; Marcel-Dekker, NY 1996, pp. 683-717.
  2. The research of Professor Mark Wightman (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC) has focused on understanding the physiological role of dopamine and related catecholamines in the brain. Wightman has been a leader in the development of electroanalytical methods involving fast scan CV with microelectrodes for detection and quantitation of these compounds. A list of his publications on the subject can be seen by going to the "application" section of www.cypresssystems.com and clicking on Mark Wightman//66-EI400.
  3. To computer simulate CV curves for various electrode mechanisms, an online program is available as developed by Professor Vining and linked as ASDL site #005005 titled “Cyclic Voltammetry Simulator.” The simulation program can be downloaded from this site: http://employees.oneonta.edu/viningwj/

Acknowledgment

The assistance of Dr. Richard S. Kelly, Department of Chemistry, East Stroudsburg University, E. Stroudsburg, PA., to this experiment is hereby acknowledged.

Commentary

Professor Mark Wightman, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC, has focused on understanding the physiological role of dopamine and related catecholamines in the brain. He has been a leader in the development of Electroanalytical methods involving fast scan CV with microelectrodes to detect and quantify these compounds. Reference #3 gives a website reference to the research of the UNC group.